Skip to main content

Full text of "The Blue book, Tampa, Florida"

See other formats


3.902 

>b GES1ALOGY COIXECTIDH 

.4 

.5208 



v 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 02309 8806 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/bluebooktampafloOOhaze 




TAMPA, FLA, 
IS) 514 



Mrs. Pauline Brown-Hazen 



Author and Publisher 



1914 

Tribune Publishing Company 
Tampa, Florida 







. 


COPYRIGHTED 
1914 






BY MRS. 


PAULINE BROWNE-HAZEN 











1415208 

Introductory Note 



This book differs in many ways from the Tampa Blue Book of 
the previous year. Its main feature and one which is entirely new, 
is the History of the Pioneers of Tampa, which claims the first part of 
the book. This history includes over thirty families who came here 
prior to the year 1870. This real pioneer period covers the time of 
the Indian wars and Civil War. 

The book has entailed much patience and research, and in every 
case the information is authentic, facts having been obtained 
from the oldest living descendants of these families. Great care has 
been given in recording exact dates and names. All data is given 
in alphabetical order, thus adding to the convenience of those who 
consult the book. 

The second part gives the classified information of Tampa of- 
ficials and organizations of 1914. In this is included the City, County, 
State and United States officials who have their residence in Tampa; 
Benevolent, Historical and Patriotic organizations, Literary, Music, 
Social and Foreign clubs. 

The third part of the book contains the Business Directory, in- 
cluding the best and most reliable firms. I wish to express appre- 
ciation for the encouragement and cooperation received in this work, 
and for the valuable aid rendered by advertisers. No charge has 
been made for any part of the history recorded, this being a de- 
parture from the usual rule of getting up such books. In return I 
solicit the patronage of all who are interested in Tampa and par- 
ticularly of all descendants of the pioneer families recorded herein. 

The price of the book, $1.75, merely covers its cost, and brings 
it within the reach of all. 

Sincerely yours. 




**t&*c4st**^ 




Contents 



BENEVOLENT ORGANIZATIONS: 

Associated Charities 37 

Children's Home 37-38 

Civic Association - 41-43 

Dorcas Society 38 

Hillsborough County Humane Society 38-39 

Old Peoples' Home 39 

Womans' Christian Temperance Union 40 

Woman's City Club 43 

Womans' Home and Hospital 40-41 

Young Men's Christian Association 43-44 

Young Woman's Christian Association 45-46 

CIGAR INDUSTRY 3-4 

CITY, COUNTY, STATE, U. S. OFFICIALS AND FOREIGN 
CONSULS: 

Board of Health 34 

Board of Trade 33 

Board of Port Commissioners 34 

Board of Public Works 34 

City Officials 32 

County Officials 34-35 

Foreign Consuls 35-36 

Merchant's Association 33 

State Legislature , 35 

U. S. Government Officials 35 

FOREIGN CLUBS: 

Centro Asturiano 63 

Centro Espanol de Tampa 63 

ClRCULO ClJBANO 64 

Deutsch-Amerikanischeh Verein 64 65 

HISTORICAL AND PATRIOTIC: 

Colonial DAMEfl 17 

Daughters of American Revolution IT L8 

United DAUGHTERS OP CONFEDERACY IS ID 

UNITED Spanish Waii Vktkiians 1*) 50 

Veroissmeinnicht Verein 19 



HISTORY OF TAMPA PIONEERS: 

Brown 4 

Coller-Jackson 4-6 

Covacevich 6-7 

Co WART 7-8 

Ferris 8 

Givens 8-9 

Hayden 9 

Henderson 9-1 1 

Hooker 11 

Jackson 1 1-13 

Kendrick 13-14 

Kennedy 14-16 

Krause 16 

Leonardi 18 

Lesley 16-17 

McCarty 18-19 

McKay 19-22 

Miller 23 

Mitchell 22-23 

Modlen 27 

Montesdosca-Dalauney 26-27 

Moore-Post 23-26 

Nunez 27-28 

Robles 28-29 

Spencer 29-30 

Turman 30 

Wall-Friebele-Clarke 30-31 

LITERARY AND MUSICAL CLUBS: 

Draper Self-Culture Club 51 

Friday Morning Musicale 51-53 

Students' Art Club 53-54 

Woman's Club 54-55 

Woman's Republic 56 

Automobile and Golf Club 57-58 

Fortnightly Club 57 

Saturday Card Club 57 

Tampa Music Club 65-67 

Tennis and Canoe Club 58 

Wednesday Club 59 

Yacht and Country Club 58-59 

Ye Mystic Krewe of Gasparilla 59-62 

TAMPA, A MILITARY POST 1-5 



Index to Business Directory 



American Laundry Co 73 

American National Bank 75 

Ball Grocery Co 88 

Beckwith Jewelry Co., W. H 80 

Brengle, S. F 91 

Burns, C. C 74 

Citizens Bank and Trust Co 86 

Crenshaw Bros. Seed Co 69 

Crescent Livery Stables 75 

Davis Shoe Co 70 

Dawson & Thornton 86 

Elite Beauty Parlor 86 

Favorite Line Steamers 87 

Fitzgerald-Pomar Shoe Co 79 

Folk's Department Store 71 

Fuller, W. R 77 

Gerald, J. B 74 

German-American Club 85 

Giddens Clothing Co., Henry 78 

Glidden's Racket Store 75 

Goodrich, S. F 74 

Gourlie's Orchestra 71 

Gule City Painting and Decorating Co 71 

Gulf Furniture Co 78 

Harris Clothing Co SO 

Hendry & Knight SO 

Hill, Miss Helen, Kindergarten ST 

Hodge & Sherman 90 

Ideal CLEANING Co., The 82 

joughin co., h. t 7 1 

Kimball Piano Co 83 

Maas Bros 68 

Maas, the I [ABERDASHEH 7 J 



McKee & Co 89 

Murphy, Mrs. S. D 76 

"Nubone" Corset 87 

Owen-Cotter Jewelry Co 73 

Pannell, Wm., Sales Agent Vitrified Brick 82 

Peninsular Telephone Co 76 

Reed, J. L., Undertaker 70 

Sanchez & Haya 85 

Steer-Saxby, Mrs. Helene 78 

Song Shop, The 77 

Southern Loan and Jewelry Co 70 

Tampa Bay Hotel 81 

Tampa Book and News Co 68 

Tampa-Cuba Cigar Co 92 

Tampa Electric Co 84 

Tampa Gas Co 72 

Tampa Municipal Band 85 

Tarr-Martin Furniture Co 79 

Town Talk Flour 88 

Tribune Job Office 91 

Williams Furniture Co 69 

Wolf Bros 75 



Tampa First a Military Post 

Old Tampa Bay was first named Espiritu Santo Bay (Holy 
Spirit), by Hernando DeSoto, the Spanish explorer, who landed 
near Tampa, May 25, 1539 on Whitsunday. Afterward it was called 
Tampa Bay, after the Indian settlement, Tampa— Tampa itself being 
an Indian name. The Spanish government had owned the territory 
of Florida for nearly three centuries, when in 1821 "The Exchange 
of Flags" proclaimed the ownership of the United States Government. 
Three years after this, February, 1824, Colonel George Marshall 
Brooke, with a detachment of United States troops, was sent here 
to locate a camp or cantonment, to protect the Government's prop- 
erty — the beautiful live oak grove in that portion known as The 
Garrison. On December 10, 1830 the cantonment was made a military 
reservation of sixteen square miles, which was named Fort Brooke, 
after Colonel Brooke. The post became the most important in 
Florida as a protection for the white settlers against the Indians, 
and Tampa was headquarters for the outlying military posts: Fort 
Dade, Fort Myers, Fort Meade and others. 

Tampa was distinctly a miltary post from the time Fort Brooke 
was established, continuing so for half a century. All the pioneers 
who are still living, declare that it was never a fishing village, as it 
has sometimes been called. In real pioneer days the only fishing 
camp in South Florida was Hunter's Fishery, located on the Big 
Manatee River. No fish were ever shipped out of Tampa until 
Plant's South Florida Railroad was built. The first fish transactions, 
excepting the local markets, was begun in recent years by John 
Savarese and the Mcllvaine brothers. The streets in Fort Brooke 
had shell roads and walks even in the early thirties, making the post 
very attractive. It was by nature a beautiful spot with its mag- 
nificent live oaks, heavily hung with Spanish moss, bounded on one 
side by the Hillsborough river and on another by the Hillsborough 
Bay, which joins its waters with those of Tampa Bay, and the Gull 
of Mexico. The first city site comprised one hundred and sixty acres, 



2 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

which the Government turned over to Tampa. Washington street 
became the principal business street, as Franklin street is the chief 
business street of today. Ox teams and mule teams were the only 
means of hauling and traveling about the village and through the 
country. Settlers came for twenty-five miles or more to Tampa for 
their provisions and mail. The officers and soldiers who had families 
brought them here, and civilians imigrated from time to time, until 
the village grew slowly but surely into a city. The first families 
underwent many privations. They raised and ginned their cotton; 
spun it into yarn, which they dyed with wild indigo; wove into goods, 
and made up into garments for wear. They had no schools at first, 
but taught their own children as best they could. They saw much 
of war, the men going forth to battle in the Seminole war of 1835-42, 
many of them never returning. Again duty called forth surviving 
ones in the war between the States of 1861-65. The heroism of the 
pioneers, not only of the men but of the women, and the strong, un- 
wavering effort of these founders of Tampa in establishing and 
maintaining their homes, and therefore the town itself, should com- 
mand the deep respect and love of every patriotic citizen. 

The original military reservation of sixteen square miles was 
reduced by executive orders as war troubles ceased, until in 1878 
only a comparatively small portion remained. On January 4, 1883 
the reservation was relinquished and was transferred by the Secre- 
tary of War to the Interior Department. The land was restored to 
public domain under the law then in force, and was open to home- 
stead claims. The officers' headquarters, which is still standing as 
one of the few landmarks of pioneer days in this now prominent 
city of sixty-five thousand population, is a frame building which 
replaced the original log building first used by the army officers and 
which had been burned. After the abandonment of the post in 1883 
this building was being torn down when Dr. Edmund S. Carew and 
his wife, Lizzie W. Carew, came to Tampa. By Dr. Carew's request 
the building was left standing. He then entered homestead claim 
for one hundred and sixty acres in Fort Brooke, and the large old 
building became their home. Litigation followed and for a number 
of years the settlers in that portion of the city who had purchased 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 3 

or homesteaded lands, were doubtful of being able to hold them. 
This litigation was finally settled in 1905, Mrs. Carew, widow of Dr. 
Carew, and other claimants of the section holding a portion of their 
claims. The question of rights to properties in the Garrison having 
been settled the development of Tampa's harbor in that section 
forged ahead and Tampa has today a $38,000,000 port, which is the 
nearest available port of importance in the United States to the 
Panama Canal. 



CIGAR INDUSTRY 



Although the history set forth here is not intended to reach 
beyond the period of 1870, and no families are recorded herein 
which came to Tampa later than that period, it is almost imperative 
to mention the cigar industry, as Tampa has become the most im- 
portant cigar manufacturing city in the world. Thirty million dollars 
was brought to Tampa during the year 1913 by the cigar industry, 
284,000,000 cigars being shipped out of Tampa during the year. This 
industry makes Tampa the eleventh city in the Unilted States as a 
revenue producer for the government. V. Martinez Ybor, Edward 
Manrara and Sanchez & Haya were the pioneers in the manufacture 
of cigars in Tampa, coming here in 1886. Ybor City was founded 
then and named for Mr. Ybor, who is called the "Father of the Cigar 
Industry in Tampa." Great destinies are sometimes determined by 
small incidents. There is such an incident, known only to a few, 
which is here published for the first time and which turned the 
tide for Tampa. Mr. Ybor was seeking a location for cigar factories 
in Florida, and many propositions had been made by him to differ- 
ent cities, but no decision had been reached. One day a telegraph 
operator here received a telegram from the town of San ford ad- 
dressed to V. Martinez Ybor, telling him to come at once, that the 
town of Sanford had accepted his proposition to locate the cigar 
factories there. The Operator was SO upset thai he read the telegram 
aloud, and George II. Packwood, Sr., who was sitting in the office 
heard it. The latter having Tampa's welfare at heart, knew that 
something must be done at once to save the day. He took the liberty 



4 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

to have an answer sent back to San ford stating that it was too late, 
as Tampa had just closed the deal bringing the cigar factories here. 
Mr. Packwood then notified the Secretary of the Board of Trade, who 
called a meeting at once and the deal to locate the proposed factories 
was made. Citizens of Tampa then gave a large tract of land and 
Ybor City was founded. The factories of Ybor & Manrara and 
Sanchez & Haya were built at the same time, the latter being the 
first to open. West Tampa later also became a center for the manu- 
facture of cigars. 

HISTORY OF TAMPA PIONEERS 

[Note: For the easier tracing of the families recorded here, 
the names of the heads of each family and the first descendants of 
each are printed in italic letters.] 

BROWN — W. Charles Brown came to Tampa from Athens, Ohio, 
in November, 1855. He was a civil engineer, and the clerk of court 
of the city at one time. He served in the Seminole Indian war, being 
one of Captain Sparkman's company. He married Mary E. Hager, 
June 23, 1859, who came here December 8, 1855 from St. Augustine, 
Fla., with her mother, Mrs. Florencia Hager, the latter afterward 
marrying Louis Bell. Mr. Brown surveyed some of the outlying land 
around Tampa. He died December 31, 1904. His widow and their 
four children are still living. The children are: Mrs. Mary Sidney 
(Tom) Gibbons, Mrs. Minnie (Louis) Carney, of Port Tampa; 
Flossie and Karl, the last two named being unmarried. The widow 
and the descendants, except Mrs. Carney, live on Washington street, 
this city. 

COLLER-JACKSON — Levi Coller was, as far as can be ascer- 
tained, about the first American white pioneer of the city of Tampa, 
who was a permanent settler. He was of English and German 
descent, and came from Massachusetts to St. Augustine in 1812, 
married Nancy Dixon, of English and French ancenstry two years 
later. During the war of 1812 Florida was the bone of contention 
of Spain, England and American governments. After the restoration 
of peace, the Coller family moved to Alachua County. About the 
year 1823 Mr. Coller came to Tampa prospecting, with a view of 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 5 

settling here. He made the perilous journey on horseback and alone. 
He selected a beautiful piece of land to homestead, but, unfor- 
tunately, did not file his preemption papers before returning to his 
family in Alachua. When he came again to Tampa in 1824 with 
his family, the Government agents had selected the same tract of 
land for a military post — Fort Brooke, this being known today as 
The Garrison. Coming to Tampa with the Collers were two 
families named Dixon and Ellis, their descendants having finally 
drifted away from the city. The Coller family built a home on the 
eastern shore where two streams joined and empty into the bay. 
One of the streams of water is still called Coller's Creek. The 
Indians were friendly to the family and Levi Coller became pros- 
perous. Most of the war vessels which guarded Tampa and Fort 
Brooke anchored off Coller's Creek, and purchased supplies from 
the Coller farm. After the outbreak of the Seminoles and the 
massacre of Major Dade and his men, which is well known history, 
the Coller family and others moved into two tents at the fort, 
where they were better protected against the Indians. After a few 
weeks General Gaines and his company come to the relief of Major 
Beldon and his company, at Fort Brooke. Captain Crowell came 
later and, by invitation, the Collers lived on his well equipped ship 
for many months. During an epidemic of measles and fever, four 
of the younger Coller children died. Nancy, the eldest, was also 
ill, and her life was saved by Dr. Robert Jackson, a West Point 
student, stationed at the fort as surgeon's chief steward. Nancy 
Coller married the handsome young physician in September, 1836. 
The children of Levi and Nancy Coller became some of Tampa's 
leading citizens, as follows: Mrs. Nancy (Robert) Jackson. Cor- 
delia, Harry, who first married Cooper Cason, and after his death 
married Charles Hoey. She died in 1009 at the age of 92 leaving no 
children. Mrs. Eliza (Louis) Bell, whose only living child is Anna 
Bell, corner Morgan and Bell streets, the Garrison. Mrs. Mercedes 
(Louis G.) Covacevich, (died I860). Their offspring are enumerated 
in the account of the Covacevich family. John Colli r. who married 
Lavina Shannon. Mrs. Lucinda (Henry) Oowart, who i^ living on 
Harrison street. (wSce Cowart family on separate p&ge.) Mrs. 



6 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

Jeanette (W. T.) Haskins. Mrs. Haskins, who is the youngest of the 
Coller family, survives her husband and lives on Hillsboro street. 
She gave birth to the following children: Levi, W. T., Jr. (dead), 
Eugene, of Bellair, Fla. ; Jennie C, now Sister Mary Camillus of the 
Convent of Mercy, New Orleans; Mrs. Mary Ann (S. A.) Phillips 
and Kate Haskins, unmarried. W. T. Haskins took a homestead 
of 40 acres in Hyde Park, which fronted on the Bay, part of the land 
being where Plant and Hyde Park avenues now are. This joined 
the Robert Jackson homestead. About that time, three well-to-do 
families of Jackson, Haskins and Hayden owned about all of the 
valuable section of Hyde Park. Because of the inconvenience of 
getting their children across the Hillsboro River by boat, the Haskins 
family finally gave to General Washington their homestead claim 
and purchased property on the east side of the river, which has since 
become very valuable. After the close of the Seminole Indian war 
Dr. Robert Jackson, who married Nancy Coller, resigned from mili- 
tary service, and became a civilian. He built his home near the 
west bank of the Hillsboro River, and Tampa Bay. Mr. Jackson 
was judge of the Probate Court of Hillsborough County for a num- 
ber of years, and was frequently called by physicians in consultation. 
Robert Jackson died March 2, 1865, and his wife survived him many 
years, dying in 1907 at the good old age of ninety-seven. The names 
of both these pioneers are beloved in Tampa. Their sons and 
daughters who have survived them are: Captain W. P. Jackson, who 
married Lunna Collins, whose offspring are Mrs. Mary (Henry 
Grady) Lester, Bartow, who married Addie Howell; Robert, Jr., who 
married Orie Hochstein; W. Preston, who married Bertha Chason, of 
Bainbridge, Ga., and Lucile, unmarried. Mrs. Mary Cardy (died 
recently) a daughter, Theresa Bryan, survives her. John B., un- 
married. Robert A., ex-sheriff of the county. Mrs. Cordelia (E. A.) 
Barclay, of Elgin, 111. Mrs. Theresa (M. T.) Cheeseborough, of 
Galveston, Tex. 

COVACEVICH — Louis G. Covacevich was among the well known 
early settlers of Tampa. He was born in Austria, and came to 
Tampa in 1837. He was a merchant, and after the Civil War entered 
into partnership with Captain Miller. He married Mercedes 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 



Coller, one of the daughters of the earliest pioneers, Levi 
Coller. Their name has not been continued for the reason that 
all their offspring were daughters except one, Louis, Jr., who was 
killed in the Civil War. The daughters were four: Mrs. Mary 
(James) Williams, of Crystal River, Florida, the children being 
Eunice and Agnes, (both married). Mrs. Nancy Phillips, of Har- 
wichport, Mass., whose children are Mrs. Agnes (Henry) Chase; 
Louis, who married Sue Kelly, and Earl, who married Alice Walker. 
Mrs. Laura (Doc) Rawles, of Manatee County. Mrs. Johanna 
(James) Brandon. Both Mr. and Mrs. Brandon died several years 
ago. Their children are John, of Riverview, who married Angie 
Hendry; Camillus B., of Tampa, who married Nellie Blount; Covace- 
vich Louis, of Tampa, who married Emily Whitney; Letticia, unmar- 
ried; Mrs. Doc Estelle (W. A.) Varnedoe, of Tampa; James, of 
Gardner, Fla., who married Minnie Waldron. 

COWART — Benjamin Cowart and his wife, Margaret Chesser, 
of Georgia, came to Tampa with their children in 1849. Mr. Cowart 
opened a butcher shop here which became a thriving business. The 
eldest son of Benjamin and Margaret Cowart is Benjamin Thomas, 
D.D.S., an eminent citizen who married Maggie Packer, of Key 
West. At the age of sixteen this boy went to sea, subsequently 
enlisting in the United States revenue service. He was a private in 
Company B, Seventh Regiment Florida Volunteers in the Civil War, 
and fought in the battles of Chickamauga and others. He was 
transferred to the navy, serving as paymaster's clerk and yoeman, 
afterward being placed in charge of the flagship Savannah. He was 
captured and placed in Libby Prison. At the close of the war he 
returned to Tampa and became deputy collector and inspector of 
customs here. Later he was assistanl special agent of the United 
States Treasury Department. While holding such appointments he 
studied medicine and dentistry, afterward completing his studies ai 
Maryland Dental College, Baltimore. He began practicing dentistry 
in Washington in 1877. Alter again holding appointments in the 
Treasury Department, stationed at St. Augustine, he removed to 

Tampa in 1885, still practicing dentistry here. He is ex-president 
a of the Florida Dental Association. The other children o\ Benjamin 



8 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

Cowart the First, are Henry, who married Lucinda Coller; Richard, 
(died unmarried) ; Jane, married Louis Covasovich, and after his 
death married John Robles; Julia, the present wife of John Robles, 
having married him after the death of her sister, Jane. 

FERRIS — William G. Ferris came to Tampa in 1833. He was 
one of the first merchants of the village and owned a schooner which 
he operated for the shipment of his goods. His first store, which 
was a small building, was washed away during the storm of 1848, 
and he rebuilt the following year. He served in the war between the 
states. Mr. Ferris married and reared a family, the best known of 
the children being Joshiah, whose sons are Josiah, Jr., publisher of 
the Orlando Sentinel, and Lee, of Tampa. Henry, a merchant of 
Tampa and Limona, who had no children, but whose widow, Mrs. 
Julia Ferris, now resides here. William, whose widow is now Mrs. 
Florence Hanford, who lived here for many years but is now in 
Birmingham, Ala. The only child of William and Florence Ferris 
is William H., now of Birmingham, Ala., his only descendant being 
Catherine Ferris, of Tampa, the young daughter of Mrs. Kate C. 
Ferris. 

GIVENS — John T. Givens was born in Abbeville District, now 
county, S. C, on September 15, 1815. He came to Florida first im 
1835 as a member of Colonel Childs' regiment of South Carolina 
Volunteers (mounted), enlisted for service in the first Seminole 
Indian war, and was stationed at Fort Brooke, Tampa. Upon the 
expiration of his term of enlistment, which was six months, he re- 
turned to South Carolina and was married in the same year, 1836, to 
Nancy C. Walker, The family removed to Florida in 1843 and set- 
tled in Madison County. There they remained five years, coming to ( 
Tampa December 24, 1848, reaching here on Christmas Day. Johni 
T. Givens was an undertaker, Martin Lovegreen becoming, in the early 
seventies, his competitor. In 1853 Mr. Givens built his home at the 
southeast corner of LaFayette and Morgan streets, where "The Castle" 
of Bay Lodge, Knights of Pythias, now stands. A portion of 
the old lot is still owned by one of his daughters, Mrs. R. B. Thomas, 
who resides upon it at No. 303 Morgan street. John T. Givens died 
November 10, 1901, aged eighty-six years; his wife died September 1, 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 9 

1897, aged seventy-six years. The children born of their marriage 
were: Robert M., died in early manhood. Thomas W., married 
twice, his wives being sisters, Mary and Angie McNeill, of Quincy, 
Fla. The first wife had two daughters, Mrs. Angie (S. W.) Allen, 
Mrs. Nannie (N. J.) Watrous. John J., married Mary Maloney, of 
Key West. Jane F., married Dr. Richard M. Wells, a prominent 
physician of village days who died here many years ago. Fannie F., 
married Col. Robert W. Thomas. He died leaving no children, but 
his wife still resides here. Anna E. married Charles E. Harrison. 
Mary L. married V. W. Olds, Both are dead. Warren A. married 
Florine Cooks, of Dawson, Ga. He died in 1912. Darwin B. married 
Anna Morris, a member of an old family then residing near Tampa. 
Clara V., died unmarried. Franklin L., and Marion, two youngest 
sons of John T. and Nancy., died in infancy. 

HAYDEN — Jesse J. Hayden married Susan Morrow, of Monroe, 
N. C, a descendant of David Crockett, the famous hunter and 
Congressman, who was killed in the battle of Alamo, 1836, war be- 
tween Texas and Mexico. Mr. Hayden and his family came to 
Tampa in 1866 and bought from General Carter some improved 
property in Hyde Park, and entered as homestead eighty acres 
adjoining it. Mr. Hayden and his daughter, Mrs. Donald S. McKay, 
sold in 1886 to H. B. Plant, for $40,000 nearly sixty acres of this 
property, including the Tampa Bay Hotel site, Plant Park and 
Atheltic Field. In the first years of Mr. Hayden's residence here 
he ran a mercantile and livery business east of the river, operating 
his own ferry for the convenience of himself and his customers, in 
crossing the river. There were born to Jesse Hayden and Susan, his 
wife, the following children: Peter, Allen and Homer, all unmarried. 
Mrs. Drucilla (William) Stanton, of Columbia, S. C. Dr. George, of 
Bradentown, who married Mary Taylor. Mrs. Martha (1). S.) Mc- 
Kay. Mrs. Tommie (Allen) McMeekin, of South Carolina. Of these 
children only Mrs. McKay now resides in Tampa. Her children are 
enumerated in the Account of the McKay family. , 

HENDERSON — Andrew Henderson and Olivia, his wife, came 
from North Georgia to Tampa, October, 1846, with their five sons, 
William Benton, John A., Fletcher, Wesley P. and Augustus. The 



10 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 



\ 



II. 



parents died, leaving these sons, when William B., the eldest, wa 
only twelve years old. This boy worked and educated himself an< 
his brothers, and the success he himself achieved makes him re 
markable among the "self-made" men of Tampa and the entin 
South. John A. married Mary Turner, who lived only a ,few years 
John A. became one of the foremost lawyers of Tampa, and Senatoiii 
from this district. He then settled in Tallahassee, marrying Misifi 
Ward, daughter of Colonel G. T. Ward, of the Confederate Service |l 
John A. was afterward general counsel and vice-president of the F I 
C. & P. Railroad. He died several years ago. Augustus died in the If 
service of the Civil War, and Feltcher also died in youth. Wesley P.\\ 
married Mamie Parrish (now Mrs. Marcus Giddens). He was super- j 
intendent of public instruction, and died here several years ago. 
William B. married Caroline Elizabeth Spencer, February 9, 1890. 
Previous to his marriage he was a clerk in Mr. Kennedy's store. 
After his marriage he bought a farm on the Alafia River and opened 
a small store there. At the outbreak of the Civil War he joined 
Captain Gettis' Company D, of the Seventh Florida Regiment. He^ 
served in this company until he was forced to return home on account t 
of having contracted tuberculosis. He engaged in the cattle business 
for ten years, and the outdoor life cured him. He then moved to 
Tampa and bought an interest from Captain John Miller in the 
latter's steamboat and mercantile business, shipping cattle to Cuba. 
After ten years the Tampa Commercial Co. was organized with Mr. 
Henderson as president. A few years later he retired from active 
business, though he still retained interest in various enterprises, 
among them the Beckwith, Henderson and Warren real estate agency, 
the Henry Giddens Clothing Co., and others. He was president of 
the following important concerns: Bank of West Tampa, West Tam- 
pa Land Improvement Co., Tampa Building and Loan Association, 
Tampa Publishing Co., and Tampa's first electric railway company. 
He was for ten years president of the State Board of Health, and 
chairman of the Board of County Commissioners, and held many 
other offices of trust. His wife died December 14, 1906, and he 
died May 7, 1909. Their children are: Gettis A., who married Hattie 
Stallings; Mrs. Blanche (Dr. L. D.) Weedon; Mrs. Cora (G. C.) 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 11 

Warren; Nellie M. (died unmarried October, 1907); John W. (un- 
married); Mrs. Mattie Ward (Amos) Harris. 

HOOKER — William Brinton Hooker was born in Ware County, 
to -a., in 1807. He moved to Florida and settled in Hamilton County, 
i White Springs, Suwanee River, in 1832. He was married to 
tor [ary Amanda Hare, near Raleigh, N. C. He was a member of the 
irst Constitutional Convention of Florida from Hamilton County. 
[r. Hooker served as Captain in the Seminole Indian war from 
335 to 1842, and also as Captain in the volunteer service from 1855 to 
358 in the Indian war. He moved from Hamilton County to 
[illsborough County in 1843, and settled on Simmons Hammock. 
[e was largely engaged in stock raising and soon became the largest 
:ock owner then in Florida. He sold his stock of cattle to Captain 
ames McKay for $60,000. He was also interested in the cultivation 
f oranges and planted the first seed from what was then called 
China" oranges, in the State of Florida. He was a man of strong 
lind and nerve, and cut the first straight road from Simmons Ham- 
ock to Manatee County and lived there for about two years. He 
T as the owner of twenty negro slaves. The place he settled in 
lanatee County is now known as Parrish. He moved from Manatee 

Tampa in 1860, and built a spacious home, which was afterward 
iased out as the Orange Grove Hotel. This building is now occupied 
S offices of the Tampa Northern Railroad. During all the pioneer 
fe Mr. Hooker kept a private teacher for his children. Hooker's 

5 oint, on the Bay, was named after this early settler. During the 
}ivil War he moved to Brooksville where he lived until his death, 
'here were born to William and Mary nine children, some of whom 
ire Tampa residents. They are: Mrs. Ann Elizabeth (John A.) 

1 oiling sw or th. Mrs. Jane E. (William) S tailings. Mrs. Martini II. 
Benjamin II.) Hagler. Mrs. Mary Henrietta (Samuel) Hope. 

Mrs. Meroba Hare (Judge Simon) Turman, who married Henry 
2rane after the death of .Judge Turman. Mrs. Sallti (Joe) Vaughn. 
Mrs. Ella (George) Fuchs. Jasper, who married Fredonia Meridith. 
Tames, who married Rosa Carpenter. 

JACKSON John Jackson was born in Ireland in L809, and 
ame to Uiis country in 1841, settling at New Orleans, La., where 



12 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

he became assistant City Engineer. He went to St. Augustine 
1843. There he met Colonel Butler, U. S. surveyor, for whom La 
Butler was named, and through him received the appointment 
general surveyor for Florida. At St. Augustine he met and marri 
Miss Ellen Maker, who had also come from Ireland. John Jacks ty 
and his wife came to Tampa in 1847. It was that year that Tam; 
was established as the county seat of Hillsoborugh County, which 
that time meant the territory included in several of the surroundii 
counties of today. Mr. Jackson being a surveyor was engaged 
lay off the city, which then comprised an area of 160 acres. He la| 
off another part of the city in 1850, and made a general map of t 
city in 1853, this map still being on record as authentic. His surv«| 
of the city was from Whiting street to Harrison, and from Ea ia 
street to Ashley, the west side of the city being bounded by tl 
Hillsborough River. Mr. Jackson named the streets after tlj. 
United States Presidents, and the officers in charge of Fort Brook^ 
Colonel Whiting was in charge of the fort at the time, and the firij 
street from the Garrison was named after that officer. Mr. Jackso 
received large contracts from the government to survey portions < 
Florida, sometimes a contract covering a radius of five hundre 
miles. He surveyed the country around Miami, and that portion 
of the State bordering on the Everglades. Once when surveyin 
below the Caloochehatchee River he unintentionally caused an India 
uprising. There was a white settlement and an Indian settlemer 
divided by what they called "a mutual ground" but beyond tha 
neither the whites or the Indians were to trespass. Mr. Jackson ha 
authority from the Government to survey a portion of the Indian; 
land, through a mistake, and in doing this the hostility of the Indian 
'was aroused and several whites killed. Captain Casey finall; 
pacified the Indians, and John Jackson miraculously escaped unhurt 
He was friendly with the Indians, and Osceola and Billy Bowlegs a 
well as others of that time were among his admirers. In 1848 i 
gale washed Mr. Jackson's home away. He had two boxes containing 
$3,000 in silver which were carried away by the waves, but he re 
covered the boxes of money after the flood subsided. John Jacksoi 
entered into the mercantile business in 1849 and was, until his deatl 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 13 

1887, a worthy and prominent citizen. He married Ellen Marr 
fl their offspring are Thomas E., formerly a merchant, now a 
1 estate dealer, who married Katherine Warner, and whose off- 
ing are Mrs. Mary Ellen (T. Van Ryan) Carty; Bernier A., who 
Id 1912; Mrs. Lula (J. T.) Joughin, and John Edward, who mar- 
■II Hildegarde Bell. Kate V., unmarried, president of the Tampa 
ic Association, and a woman of much prominence and brilliancy 
Imind. Dr. John, of New York, a specialist who is an instructor 
clinics at the Columbia University, and also has private practice, 
married Mary Gardan, of Hartford, Conn. 

KENDRICK — The Kendrick brothers of pioneer history are of 
Iglish parentage. James Kendrick, the father, was a major in the 
,r of 1812. He married Elizabeth Mickler, at St. Mary's, Ga., 
settled at Suwannee Springs, Fla., soon after the war. He 
■Ved in the First Indian disturbance called the Seven Years War, 
i{ ch began in 1835, dying during that period. His widow, Mrs. 
fi zabeth Kendrick, and their daughter and four sons, Emily, 
°ward Tatnell, William H., Hardy D. and Robert James, came 
Tampa soon after his death, about the year 1840. Both Edward 
and William H. were captains in the Seminole War, and also 
red in the war between the States, Edward T. dying during that 
-. He was sheriff of Hillsborough County in 1853. He married 
aI riba Ann Moore and their children now living are Ernest Tat- 
n !, who married his cousin, Emma Moore, and whose children are 
ia iis, who married Mattie Hardawny; Mamie, unmarried; Mrs. 
a( nice (W. G.) Lewallen, of Burnington, N. C, and Vivienne, un- 
tried. Harney, who married Russell Renneu, and their only child 
111 Mrs. Edna (Cecil) McCord. William H., known as Captain Bill 
"jndrick, of the first family already named, settled at Fort Dade, 
rty Dade City, Fla., after his service in the two wars mentioned. 
ai ; political career is familiar history to the oldest citizens c>( Flor- 
He was a member of the Senate for two terms, retiring from 
^llve political work in 187(5 to devote his time to real estate busi- 
es. He was active in inducing immigration, traveling and leetnr- 
in the North on the advantages of Florida. It is said thai it 
tt| he who gave Orlando its name, and there is a town near Oeala, 



14 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

Fla., named Kendrick after him. He is credited with having b« 
the pioneer discoverer of phosphate in Florida, finding it in Bo< 
Valley, near Fort Meade in 1880. Captain Bill was twice marri 
his first wife being Mrs. Mary Gibbons, whose only daughter n 
living in Tampa is E. Panchita, unmarried. His second wife \ 
Mattie Johnston, daughter of Abner Johnston of South Caroli 
He died in 1901 at the age of seventy-eight. Hardy D., the th 
brother of the original family in Tampa married Mrs. Alexanil 
Martin, widow of one of the pioneers who was a captain, also a mJ 
ister of the Gospel. Hardy died here many years ago. Only one 
his three children lived to grow up, Charlie, who died at the age 
twenty-one. Robert James, the fourth brother, was a physician m 
settled at Anthony, Fla., where he died many years ago, leaving 
wife, formerly Mrs. Isabella Henderson, of North Carolina. Emt 
the sister of the four KendricK brothers, married William Spend 
their children being here recorded with the Spencer family. 

KENNEDY — Thomas Pugh Kennedy descended from the El 
lish houses of Penrose, Tresse and Pugh; was born in Philadelphia 
1812. He came to Saint Augustine in 1828, and to Tampa in 18 
He established the first and only trading post here with the Indh 
and with the garrison at Fort Brooke, and later one at Charlol 
Harbor. Mr. Kennedy was on the friendliest terms with the India] 
he was just and liberal with them and they held him in high estee 
Billy Bowlegs, the old Seminole Chief, particularly admired him a 
was entertained by Mr. Kennedy and his wife as an honored gue 
Before the old chief was sent to the Indian Reservation he presenl 
to Mr. Kennedy a handsome silver medal which had been given 
him by President Van Buren at the signing of the peace treaty w« 
the Seminoles. The Kennedy family still possess this medal. ]V 
Kennedy's business called him frequently to Central and Soi 
America and Mexico. On one of these trips during the Mexican w 
while running the blockade with supplies for the American soldie 
he was captured by the Mexicans and held prisoner for many mont 
His escape, by the aid of a Mexican officer's wife, is a romantic a 
interesting story. Mr. Kennedy's wife, now Mrs. J. P. Crichton, 
Atlanta, came to Tampa a child, in 1837, with her uncle, Maj 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 15 

*aser, the officer who commanded Fort Brooke, the U. S. Gar- 

>on. She was formerly Adelaide Cristy, a cousin of Howard 

landler Cristy, artist. Mr. Kennedy became one of the wealthiest 

d most honored men in South Florida. He gave assistance in 

v siness life to several young men who later acquired fortunes and 

j came prominent citizens of Tampa, among them being the late 

m. B. Henderson, who often spoke with pride of his friendship. 

; the time of his death in 1858 Mr. Kennedy was an extensive 

operty holder throughout the State. More than $75,000 of his for- 

le went to the support of the Confederate Government in the War 

Secession. The first entry on the tax books of Hillsborough 

unty was a deed to Thomas P. Kennedy from E. T. Kendrick and 

fe, recorded March 3, 1846. He was a charter member of the first 

isonic Lodge here and his son, Thomas Pugh Kennedy, and his 

indsons have also been prominent in the organization. The old 

nnedy home and store at the foot of Washington, Tampa and 

Jiter streets, were landmarks for many years. The children of 

omas Pugh Kennedy, who lived to maturity were three: Jane, 

erward Mrs. J. W. Crichton, then a leader in the musical life of 

mpa, a graduate of the New England Conservatory of Music and 

j |O was soprano of Dudley Buck's Trinity Choir. She reestablished 

I was in charge of the music department of the Wesleyan Female 

lege. It was to her that Mr. Butterfield dedicated his song, 

hen You and I Were Young, Maggie." She died in 1890 leaving 

descendants. Thomas Pugh, 2d, who graduated in 1870 from 

tshington College, now Washington and Lee University, while Gen. 

E. Lee was president of the institution; married Miss Ida Cath- 

t, of Ocala, and I heir first home in Tampa was the site now 

upied by the First National Bank. He took prominent part in 

affairs of the community and was chairman of the Board of 

ucation at the time of his death. He was admitted to the bar 

h prospects for a brilliant career but was cut down by death in 

(5, at the age of 3fi years, leaving a widow and seven children. 

je Heights" was the name given by Mr. Kennedy to his home and 

e on the brow of the hill and the name has since been used to 

.lignate that section of the city. Henry /\, the youngest child, died 



16 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

in 1882, aged twenty-five years, unmarried. He was at one tim 
editor of The Gulf Coast Progress, one of Tampa's earliest new 
papers. The present members of the Kennedy family are Mrs. Id 
J. Kennedy, widow of Thomas P., Second, and six children, Ml 
Josephine (S. S.) Moore; Mrs. Ida (C. F.) Gay; Henry -P., w] 
married May Jordon; Thomas P., third, who married Alma Shac 
of Savannah; W. Theodore, of Colorado (unmarried), and Mi 
Maude (W. T.) Myers, of Virginia. The eldest son, John D., di» 
in Mexico in 1906. 

KRAUSE — John Henry Krause, who was notable among Tar 
pa's pioneers, was born in Saxony, Germany. He came to Tarn] 
in 1855. He was a wagon manufacturer, and had in connection wi 
it a blacksmith shop, located on the corner where the old Citizen 
Bank now stands. He also had a store of general merchandise, 1 
cated on the opposite corner, Franklin and Zack streets, whe 
Maas Bros', store is now. Mr. Krause was a conspicuous figure 
the early development of Tampa and served in the Confederate am 
in the war between the States. He married Mary E. Dagenhart 
who was born at Palatka, Fla., in 1845, and who died in this ci 
at the age of thirty-six. Mary Dagaenhardt was the daughter 
John Henry and Mary Dagenhardt, of Dresden, Germany, well knot] 
pioneers who came to Tampa about 1848. The Dagenhardt nai 
has not been continued in this city. There were born to John Henr 
Krause and Mary, his wife, eight children, four of whom still li 
here: John Henry, Jr., Fred W., both unmarried. Mrs. Henriei 
(John T.) Gunn, and Mrs. Mary (J. A. M.) Grable. The t1 
brothers were formerly in the livery business, but now are partne 
in the Hava-Tampa Cigar Factory, on Nebraska avenue, this ci 
Mr. and Mrs. Grable have no offspring. The children of Mr. a 
Mrs. Gunn are John Krause, unmarried; Mrs. Helen (Paul ( 
Lindley, of Pomona, N. C, and Jack Arbid, unmarried. 

LESLEY — Rev. Leroy G. Lesley came originally from Sov 
Carolina to Madison, Fla., and in 1848 he came to Tampa as pasl 
of the First Methodist church, which was then but a small chap 
He was accompanied by his wife, formerly Indiana C. LivingsU 
and three children. John T.; Emory L., who was killed in ea: 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 17 

nanhood by the accidental discharge of a rifle, and Mary, who first 
narried William H. Brown, and after his death, U. S. Bird, father 
lit Dr. U. S. Bird. Mrs. Mary Bird survives both husbands, and has 
>ne son, W. Lesley Brown. Leroy G. Lesley's wife died in 1859. 
His second wife, Jane Sandwich, bore him one child, Mrs. Emma 
(W. J.) Frier son, of Tampa, who died some years ago. Both Leroy 
3r. Lesley and his son, John T., served in the Indian and Civil Wars. 
The former was a captain in the Indian war, his boy serving under 
lim as private and as a lieutenant, for when duty called, the minister 
and his son were not found wanting. Both were among the most 
prominent of the pioneer citizens. John T. Lesley moved with his 
parents to Fort Brooke in 1849, and lived there for fifty-two years. 
1 During the Civil War he was captain of Company K, Fourth Florida 
Infantry. He was promoted to the rank of major but resigned in 
1863, returned home and raised a company of cavalry which he 
commanded until the close of the war. Captain John T. held many 
3ublic offices. He was sheriff, tax collector and assessor of Hills- 
borough County, 1867-68. Soon after the war he engaged in the 
cattle business. In 1876 he was elected to the State Legislature, 
erving two terms, and in 1885 was vice-president of the Constitu- 
tional Convention, which framed the present constitution. A hand- 
some gold-headed cane presented to him by the members of the con- 
vention is still treasured by his family, together with about seventy 
other canes, which have been presented to him and which hail from 
many parts of the world. He became clerk of the County Circuit 
Court in 1893; later was collector of customs for the port of the city, 
and was elected mayor of Fort Brooke in 1886, holding the office until 
Fort Brooke became a part of Tampa. Captain Lesley married Mrs. 
Margaret Brown Tucker, daughter of Major William T. Brown, in 
1858, who died in 1893. Captain Lesley died July 13, 1913. They had 
six children: Indiana, Emory Leroy, of Kissimmee; John J„ W. T.» 
sheriff, died 1904; Theodore L., and L. G. Emory L., married 
Jennie Morgan; W. T. married Sarah Yancey; Theodore L. married 
May Yancey; L. G. married Florence Yancey, the wives of the three 
last named being sisters, and they are granddaughters of Hon. William 
L. Yancey. 



en 



18 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

LEONARDI— In the year 1855 there came to Tampa from St 
Augustine, Fla., the Leonardi brothers, Vincent and Bartholomew . 
accompanied by their sisters, all of whom were married and had 
families. The descendants of this family have been born and reared 1 
here and have figured more or less prominently in the city's develop- 
ment. The Leonardi brothers were architects. Bartholomew has a 
daughter, Mrs. Annie (W. S.) Solornan, living here. Bartholomew's 
son, S. B. Leonardi and his family, are the only ones now living here 
who are from that branch of the family bearing the name of Leonardi. 
S. B. married Alia Buff, of Indiana. He is a chemist, and now is 
manufacturer of well known medicines. He was formerly the leading 
druggist of the. city. The children of his marriage are Mrs 
Marguerite (Clinton B.) Amorous; Bernandetta and Sydney B., the 
two younger children being in their teens. The Leonardi ancestors 
were from Italy. The sisters of Vincent and Bartholomew, who! 
came with them to this city were Mrs. Theodosia (John P.) Andreu; 
Mrs. Jane Canning, and Mrs. Florencia (Tom E.) Hagar. Captain 
J. P. Andreu carried the mail from Tampa to Point Pinellas, now 
St. Petersburg, and was proprietor of an oyster house, supplying the 
village and Garrison with this product of Tampa Bay. The children 
of Mr. and Mrs. Andreu are Mrs. W. J. Holden, Mrs. Nora Jeter, 
Mrs. C. C. Lebey, Mrs. J. S. Smith, and Katie, the latter being un- 
married. Mrs. Canning and Mrs. Andreu are still living at a good 
old age. Mrs. Canning's children are Mrs. Lillie (Cal) Floyd, a 
widow; Mrs. Irene (P. B.) Stuart, Mrs. Emma Patten, a widow, and 
B. Burns. Mrs. Hager, who died some years ago, came here a 
widow and married Louis Bell, the only child of this marriage being 
George, who married Linnie Post. The children of the first marriage 
of Mrs. Hager are Mrs. Mary E. (W. C.) Brown, a widow; Mrs. 
Ellen (George) Lyons, Mrs. Melvina (L. A.) Masters, and William, ] 
who married Miss Bradley. 

McCARTY — Mitchell McCarty, one of Tampa's early settlers, 
was born in Rochester, N. Y., in September, 1818. Leaving home in 
early youth because of trouble with his father over property rights, 
he wandered south and arrived at Mobile, Ala. There he met 
Elizabeth Aylisse Simmons, who, on April 21, 1844, became his wife. 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 19 

She was born in Savannah, Ga., January 10, 1819, and passed much 
of her girlhood in this section of Florida. Her father, Rev. Daniel 
Simmons, a Baptist minister, purchased 640 acres of land from the 
Spanish Government, upon which he located with his family. He was 
a man of means and improved his property, but during one of the 
Indian insurrections the family fled for their lives to Alabama. Rev. 
Simmons never attempted to regain possession of his property 
around "Simmons' Hammock," near Seffner, Fla., where some valuable 
orange groves are now located. About 1846 the families of Simmons, 
McKay and McCarty left Mobile by the same boat, landing at 
Chasehowiska, Fla. The McKays soon afterward came to Tampa, 
but the other two families remained in Hernando County until 1849, 
when Mr. McCarty moved to Tampa. He purchased from Captain 
Lesley, property on Washington street, between Morgan and Marion, 
and engaged in a general merchandise business. He was a charter 
member of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He died Novem- 
ber, 1858, being survived by his wife and three daughters. The 
widow of Mitchell McCarty was an influential member of the First 
Baptist church and did much for its upkeep until her death on 
February 21, 1859. The McCarty offspring were Mrs. Mary Jane 
(John A.) McKay, who died in 1911, and whose children are here 
recorded with the McKay family; Mrs. Margaret (H. W.) Sherritt, 
whose two children are Mrs. Mollie (J. I.) Carruthers and Mack 
unmarried; and Ada McCarty, unmarried. 

McKAY — Captain James McKay, The First, formerly of Scot- 
land, founder of this prominent family in Tampa, came here October 
13, 1846 from Mobile, Ala. He was accompanied by his wife, 
formerly Matilda Kail, and her mother, Mrs. Sarah Kail. Captain 
McKay was a man of considerable means, and had various interests in 
Tampa. He owned a number of sailing and steam vessels. He 
originated the cattle trade between Tampa and Cuba, and also the 
mail route between Tampa and Cedar Keys, and his own steamers 
carried the mail to and from these points; also freight and passengers. 
He also ran a fonr-horse coach from Tampa to Gainesville, Fla., 
before the Civil War. The cattle business in that period was as 
important as the fruit business is now in this section. Captain 



20 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

McKay dealt in cattle to the extent of about $60,000 per month. 
He also owned a saw mill and one of the few stores of pioneer days. 
The site of his store was corner of Franklin and Washington streets, 
where his grandson, Mayor Donald Brenham McKay now has his 
office. It was a small wooden building, which was years afterward 
replaced by the present brick structure, this being the first brick 
edifice ever erected in Tampa. The first home of the McKay's was 
the entire square where the Almeria Hotel was afterward located. 
When the Civil War broke out, Captain McKay and his son, Donald 
S., had just reached Cuba with a ship load of cattle. In running a 
blockade from that island to Tampa, they were captured. The 
father was kept a prisoner in Key West for several months, and the 
son was transported to Fort LaFayette, New York harbor. After 
thirteen months in prison there, Donald S. was released on parole 
and returned by transport to Key West. On his way down he wit- 
nessed the sinking of the Cumberland and Congress by the Merrimac. 
Donald S. came home and joined a battalion and remained in the 
Confederate service until the end of the war. His father was ap- 
pointed Commissary General to furnish cattle for the Tennessee 
army. Captain McKay sold some of his steamers to Miller and 
Henderson, who became associated with him in carrying on the 
cattle trade and mail route. Captain McKay built the first jail and 
court house of Tampa, and furnished all the nails and lumber for 
the First Baptist church. Mrs. Sarah Kail paid for the labor of its 
erection. This church is today one of the few old landmarks of the 
early life of Tampa. This building stands opposite the Tribune 
building, on Tampa street, and is now Bomford's Plumbing Shop. 
It stood in a grove of oak trees in pioneer days. Captain McKay 
was the first mayor of Tampa. He was a member of the first lodge 
established here (Masonic), in which he owned fifty-six shares. 
James McKay, The First, and Matilda, his wife, were blessed with a 
large family. George, who died in youth; Sarah A.; James, Second; 
Marian, Tillie, Allie, Donald S., John Angus, and Charles, who died 
in early manhood. Sarah A. married R. B. Thomas. She died 
several years ago leaving no children. James, Second followed his 
father's footsteps, being also a sea captain and cattle dealer. He 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 21 

married Mary Crichton, daughter of Dr. John T. Crichton, one of 
Tampa's first and most prominent physicians. Dr. Chrichton lived 
here many years and moved to Atlanta, Ga., where he died, leaving 
several children. James, Second, lived here until a few years ago, 
and was prominent in public affairs. He was once mayor of the 
city, and state senator from his district. He is now Marine Superin- 
tendent of United States Transports, and in this capacity inspects 
all transports that are chartered by the U. S. Government along the 
Atlantic and Gulf coasts. He also has supervision over quarter- 
masters' boats stationed along the Atlantic coast. His headquarters 
are in New York City, but he has been stationed at Galveston, 
Tex. during Mexican disturbances. The offspring of this branch of 
the McKay family are: Tillie, of this city, widow of J. D. Clarke, 
of Cornwall-on-the-Hudson, N. Y.; Mrs. Blanche (T. L.) Morton, 
of Virginia; James C, who married Lillian MacDonald, of Fernan- 
dina; Julia, who died several years ago; Mrs. Madge (C.) Lastra; 
Mrs. Mary (John O.) Kirkpatrick, of Nashville; Harold, who mar- 
ried Bess Fisher, of Lima, O. ; Fred, unmarried. Marian, daughter 
of James, First, married William Randolph and their only offspring 
is Sarah, wife of Judge W. A. Carter. Tillie, also of the first 
family, married Dr. John Wall, and there was born to them a son, 
Charles, who now lives in Tampa. Allie married Howell T. Lykes, 
Sr., and there were born to them the following sons and our daughter; 
Mrs. Tillie (S. B.) Turman; Fred, unmarried, a cattle dealer in 
Cuba; Howell T., Jr., married Stella Long; Thomas, unmarried, who 
was the Gasparilla King, 1913; Lipscomb, unmarried; James, of Gal- 
veston, Tex., and who married Viva Parkhill, daughter of Judge 
and Mrs. C. B. Parkhill; John Wall, who married Ruth Freeman; 
Joseph, unmarried. The Lykes Brothers, like their grandfather 
McKay, are cattle dealers. Donald S. McKay, formerly a sea cap- 
tain, now a pure food inspector, married Mattie Hay den, member 
of another of the pioneer families. Their offspring include Marion, 
Mrs. Martha Porter, May, who died in 1900; George, who married 
Annie McDermott, and Donald, Jr. John Annus, the youngest sur- 
viving son of James, First, married Mary Jane MeCarty, and their 
offspring are Donald Brenham, now mayor of the city and editor of 



22 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

the Tampa Times, who married Aurelia Gutierrez, daughter of G. 
Gutierrez, a prominent Spanish citizen who did much toward bringing 
the cigar industry to Tampa. Mrs. Margaret (C. C.) Woodward; 
Charles A., a member of the firm of Maas Bros., and president of the 
Retail Merchants Association of the city, who married Irene Mc- 
Keague, of Pennsylvania; Mitchell S. McKay, who married Janie 
Givens; Mrs. Ada (Lawson) Magruder, of DeLand, and Kennith I., 
unmarried. 

MITCHELL— The name Mitchell is one of the most prominent 
in the history of Tampa, and the entire State. The Mitchell family I 
came from Alabama in 1846 and first settled at Simmons' Ham- j 
mock, coming to Tampa in 1854. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Mitchell] 
were parents of seven distinguished sons, Henry Laurens, Samuel, 
Robert, George, Charles Lucian, Frank and Thomas. The two last^ 
named boys were both officers in the Civil War service, and both; 
were killed therein. Henry Laurens was among the most prominent! 
citizens in the entire history of Tampa. He was born September 3,{J 
1831. He studied law in the office of Judge James Gettis, a beloved! 
pioneer, who died a bachelor, and his name therefore is known 
among only the oldest citizens today. Judge Gettis aided many 
young men of those days. The late W. B. Henderson named his 
eldest son in honor of this man. When he was admitted to the bar,, 
Henry L. Mitchell was elected State Attorney for the Sixth Judiciani 
Circuit, holding this office until 1861, when he entered the Con- 
federate service, attaining the rank of Captain in the Fourth Florida 
Infantry. After the Vicksburg campaign he resigned to peform his 
duties as a member of the State Legislature from Hillsborough 
County. He was twice reelected. He was Judge of the Circuitti 
Court from 1877 to 1888. After this he was one of the Justices of 
the Supreme Court for two and a half years. In 1892 he was 
elected to the highest office of the State, that of Governor. After 
his term as Governor closed he returned to Tampa and was chosen | 
as Clerk of the Circuit Court and County Treasurer, holding these 
offices until his death, October 14, 1903. His widow, formerly Mary 
E. Spencer, whom he married in 1866, survives him. Although having 
no children Governor Mitchell has many namesakes, one being a 



ft 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AXD PIONEERS, 1914 23 

rominent citizen of today, H. L. Knight. Samuel Mitchell married 
ane Urguhart, of Welbourne, Fla. Their only surviving offspring 
ho lives in Tampa is Edward Mitchell, who married Alice Hamphill. 
\obert Mitchell married Leonora Crum. They have reared a large 
imily and live at Homeland. Rev. George Mitchell married Nanny 
lderman. Their children are Thomas, now of Missouri, and Mrs. 
[ay (Bert) McMullen, of Clearwater. Charles Lucian married 
lien Martin Spencer. Their offspring all settled in Tampa. They 
e Mrs. Eugenia (S. W.) Graham, Mrs. Nellie (B. A.) Ferguson, 
rs. Minnie (O. P.) Stallings, Dr. Lucien Bayard Mitchell, who 
arried Marie Gutierrez; Mrs. Viva (A. J.) Angle, who died Feb- 
lary, 1913, and Spencer Mitchell. The widow of Charles Lucian 
ill lives here. 

MILLER — Captain John Miller is highly deserving of mention 

nong the men of affairs in Tampa during that period immediately 

llowing the Civil War, having first come to Tampa in 1865. He 

is born in Norway, August 4, 1834. When he was eleven years 

i he sailed to Quebec as a cabin boy. He learned navigation on an 

tnerican vessel, serving on this vessel for four years. He thus vis- 

:d many parts of the world, but received no pay for services. He 

en became a sailor on a packet boat between New York and 

verpool. He gradually advanced until he became owner of a brig, 

uch was used as a transport by the Federal Government during 

B war of 1861-65. He purchased a schooner when war trouble 

is over and came to Tampa. He later not only conducted trading 

ssels, but became, in 1867, the leading merchant and banker here. 

ter a few years he admitted William B. Henderson as a partner, 

5 firm continuing as Miller and Henderson for twenty years. In 

•ent years Captain Miller operated the Tampa Steam Ways of 

ich he was the owner. He was a Royal Arch Mason. He married 

ihitabel Phillips in 1861, losing her by death in 1884. Captain 

Her died in October, 1911. They have two children, John II.. who 

ITied Addie Hurts, whose only child is Mrs. .Jessie (Ottis) Wallace. 

'3. Lucy P. (\{. A.) Crowell, whose children arc Mrs. licrdina 

,. H.) Tarr and Mrs. Stella ((). G.) Sexton, ,1 r. 

MOORE POST -The history of the Moore family would no! 



24 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

be complete without the statement that they are direct descendani 
of Lord Samuel Stanford, who was born in Staffordshire, Englam 
He was the second son and only heir to the title, but preferring 1 1 
freedom and liberty of America, he came to the United States air 
became a citizen of Dauphin County, N. C, sometime before ttl 
American Revolution. He was educated in theology for the Pre; 
byterian ministry and when war was declared enlisted as a chaplat 
and soldier, fighting for Christ and liberty and carrying both swoi 
and Bible. His daughter, Euphemia Stanford, married Jose]\ 
Moore, who was of Scotch-Irish descent and second cousin to £^ 
Thomas Moore, the poet. Joseph and Euphemia Moore, with thr 
children, came to Tampa in 1842 and located, with other settlers, 
what is now known as Hyde Park, which was named after the Hy fl 
Park in London, England. This name was given by Dr. Griffith, 
Presbyterian minister and pioneer, who came here from Englam 
Prior to the naming of this district Hyde Park was known as Spanii 
Town. Beneath the ground near Spanish Town Creek some of tt 
earlier pioneers of Tampa were placed at rest, it being used as 
burial ground. Mrs. Maria Moore (Madison) Post, who is the onn! 
surviving member of the Joseph Moore family, and who still residdj 
in this city, attended the first election in this county, and which hli 
mother, Euphemia Moore, had the honor to name as Hillsboroui 
County. There is an interesting story in connection with the namii 
of this county as told by Mrs. Post, who says that it was named for: 
Mr. Hills, a hunter and trapper, because he killed the largest all 
gator, these pests being numerous at that time. It was Joseph Moo 
who installed the Masonic order in Tampa on January 16, 1850, tt 
charter for the local lodge being obtained on January 20, 1851. E 
portrait adorns the walls of the Masonic Hall of Tampa today. T! 
children of Joseph and Euphemia Moore were Samuel Louis, Fari 
Ann, Margaret, Jackson, who died unmarried; Emily, who died 
youth; Walter Raleigh, who died unmarried; William J., Maria Jai! 
Joseph, Jr., Henrietta and Martha Washington. Walter Ralei i 
Moore, according to the "Soldier Book of the South," held a d: 
tinguished record. He entered the great struggle between the Stai 
as Captain of the Twentieth Florida Regiment, and during the fo> 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 25 

ears of service was promoted by Governor Perry to the rank of 
lanjMajor and later as Colonel. Samuel Louis, the eldest son, married 
Charlotte Wheedon, whose fourteen children were as follows: Spencer, 
an who was mortally wounded in the Civil War; Samuel, who married 
tl Julia Bradley, and whose children are Mrs. Winifred (John) Winter, 
re State Recorder of Crosses in the Florida Daughters of the Con- 
federacy; Charles and Samuel, of Monticello, Fla. ; Joseph, unmar- 
Jried; William, who married Alice Stewart and whose children are 
Julia, Josephine, Alice and William; Douglas, who married Annie 
Howell and whose children are Jack and Benjamin; Hansel, who 
married Mattie Haze and whose children are Samuel and Charlotte; 
Jackson, who married Linnie Cox and whose children are Douglass, 
yc Dell, Harry, Edith and Florence; Mrs. Estelle (Will) Cook, whose 
children are Thomas, Naomi, Estelle and Willie Louise; Mrs. Minnie 
(Harry) Levick, whose only child is Kathryn Estelle; Mrs. Lou Ella 
(Thomas) Mitchell, whose only offspring, James Goodwin, received 
the thirty-first degree in Masonry at Dallas, Tex., at the age of 
twenty-six years; Mrs. Bessie (M. E.) Gerow, whose children are 
Edmonde, Lawrence, Daniel, Getas and Charles; James, who married 
Effie Bush, of Atlanta, Ga., and whose children are James and 
Marian. When James Moore was but seventeen years of age he 
won the scholarship at Thomas County, Ga., which admitted him to 
the Georgia Technological College from which he later graduated 
with high honors. Mrs. Blanche (H.) Wagner, of St. Petersburg, 
whose children are Leslie and Francis. Mrs. Mary (L. T.) Smith, the 
fourteenth child, lives in Macon, Ga. A trait peculiar to the children 
of Samuel Louis Moore and his wife, Charlotte, was that every 
member of the family were natural musicians, being able to play on 
any stringed instrument. This musical talent has been handed down 
to the present generation and stringed instruments of all kinds arc 
treasured heirlooms of a forgotten past. Maria Jane Moon married 
Madison Post, whose children are as follows: Dr. Duff, who married 
Inez McGregor, and who practiced dentistry in tins city for many 
years; was marshal in L881 and L882 and mayor 1883 L884 and 1885 

1886; president of the Board of Health in i^!>:>, and postmaster 
from and including lSf)l to 1895, during which time he established 



26 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

the free mail delivery in this city. He also established the emergency I 
hospital of Tampa. Mrs. Holly Fine, whose children are Charles || 
Post and Castell; Mrs. Liney (George) Bell, whose children are 
Hilda, Edna, Duff and Adrian. 

MONTESDOSCA-DALAUNEY— John Montesdosca, a Spanish | 
gentleman of high family, came to Tampa from his native country 
about 1830. Being highly educated and a master of languages, he| l 
acted as interpreter for the Government. He was beloved alike by I 
the Americans and the Indians. He wooed and wed a beautiful Indian l [l 
maiden, lovely of soul as in person. This girl wife died early in 
life, leaving a little daughter, Victoria. Victoria was reared by | 
Robert and Nancy (Coller) Jackson. She grew to womanhood 
and married Alfonzo Dalauney, of French birth, a lawyer by pro- 
fession, who came here to be restored to health. Mr. Dalauney was, 
from 1861 to '65, postmaster of Tampa and custom's house officer. His 
wife, Victoria, was a woman of noble character and lofty mind, and 
their children were very intelligent. Two of them, Pauline and Emma, 
were among the most prominent teachers in the public schools of the 
early days. The offspring of Alphonso and Victoria were: Pauline, 
who married Captain John B. Walton whose only child, Marie, sur- 
vives them both; Emma, who died unmarried in February, 1913; 
Harry, who died in youth unmarried, and Florida, who died in 1907 
unmarried. Captain Walton was a civil engineer and it was he who 
surveyed and laid out the town of Tarpon Springs, Fla. Marie 
Walton is now in Asheville, N. C, and is the only surviving 
descendant of Victoria. Previous to his marriage with Victoria 
Alfonso Dalauney had married a Miss St. John, of Georgia, who 
died after giving birth to one son, St. John. The boy was brought 
up by his uncle, James Dalauney, in Columbus, Ga., coming to his 
father and step-mother, Victoria, some years later. The father died 
at the close of the war, in 1865, and the boy went to Lake Providence, 
R. I., where he continued the newspaper trade begun in Tampa, and 
became editor and publisher of the East Carroll Democrat of that 
city. He married Mrs. Barbara Streffner, of that place, returning 
to Tampa in 1888 with his wife and was engaged in the newspaper 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 27 



;ire 



siness until his death in 1903. The only child of his marriage is 
*s. Pauline (James W.) Holmes, of this city. 

MODLEN — John Modlen and Christina, his wife, came to Flor- 
i just after their marriage in 1844, from Hertfort, N. C, the 
lrney being made in wagon trains. They established a camp at 
i. Mile Creek, near Tampa, but soon afterward went to Ocala. 
1846, when the family left Ocala to settle on Indian River, mis- 
rtune rose in their path, for during the storm of that time, John 
?dlen was drowned, the entire party being shipwrecked. The sur- 
rors who reached land in safety wandered about for three days 
d nights without food or dry clothing. They were rescued and 
rried to the home of Captain Russell. After a few months Mrs. 
odlen returned to Ocala and disposed of her property, coming from 
!ala to Tampa. In 1849 she was married to Captain George Per- 
ns. Their home was made on the corner of Florida avenue and 
iFayette street, and the first break that was made in the happy 
mily was when the family removed to Key West in 1862, where oc- 
rred the death of Captain Perkins in the Marine Hospital. In 
65 the widow returned to Tampa, remaining until her death in 
06, at the advanced age of eighty-seven years. There were born to 
iptain George Perkins and Christiana, his wife, three daughters, 
rs. Isabel (George) Hanson; Mrs. Susan (Charles) Stagiers, who 
ed in 1908), and Mrs. Margaret (Thomas) Billings. 

NUNEZ — Robert F. Nunez, of Georgia, came to Tampa in the 
irly forties, and in early manhood was a clerk in the store of 
ennedy & Darling. He afterward owned a store at the corner of 
Washington and Tampa streets, which he sold in 1862. He married 
»at year A. II. Craft, daughter of Rev. S. C. Craft, a Tampa niin- 
ter in charge of the First Baptist church. Mr. Nunez enlisted in 
le Civil War as Captain of Company B, Seventh Florida Regiment, 
ft his young wife at home and fought in Tennessee and Kentucky. 
Ie was in General Bragg's famous march. Unused to the colder 
imate where duty called, he contracted pneumonia, from which he 
2ver fully recovered. He resigned from the army in 1864 and died 
i 1868, at his home in Tampa. His widow is still Living in this city. 
he children of Mr. and Mrs. Nunez are: Mr$, Ruby (I. S.) Qiddens, 



I 



28 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

whose offspring are Mrs. Genevieve (Dr. Sheldon) Stringer, D; 
and little Mary Giddens. Robert Nunez, who married E. 
Hale. Their offspring are Robert, Jr., Mary, John and Paul Nui 
The sisters of the widow, Mrs. A. H. (R. F.) Nunez, are ]V 
Maggie Merken and Mrs. Mary Pierce, both of Texas. During 
forties R. F. Nunez's sister, Mrs. Nancy Miller, a widow with i 
child, Emma, came to Tampa to live with him. Emma grew I 
womanhood in Tampa and was sent to the Wesleyan Female Colle:, 
from whence she was graduated. She married J. A. Edwards : ji 
lawyer, of Atlanta, Ga., and still lives in that city, being a widi 
Her offspring are: Kate Edwards, celebrated portrait painter, v 
has a studio in Chicago; Lee Edwards, of Atlanta, and Mrs. E 
Edwards Lovett, wife of Dr. Lovett, of Atlanta. 

ROBLES — Joseph Robles was born in Madrid, Spain, Septemli 
15, 1817. He came to America and settled at Darien, Ga., in 18;: 
He came to Florida and lived at Newmansville and Fort White dn 
ing the early part of the frontier days. He married Mary G arris \ 
in 1841. He served in the Indian trouble around Fort White, ai 
his arm was broken by the shot of an Indian. He came to Tama 
1849 and lived here until his death, February 1907, in his ninetie: 
year. During his residence in Tampa he served in the Indian am 
Civil Wars. While running a blockade from Tampa to Cuba 
was captured and placed in a Federal Prison for several montl* 
There were born to Joseph and Mary seven sons and three daughte 
all now living except Michael F+ who died in Camp Carson Priso 
a Federal prisoner, in February, 1865. The wife of Joseph w. 
born in 1824, died in 1886. The sons and daughters are: John 
Joseph P.; Seaborn L.; Greene W.; Francis M.; Horace T.; Mr 
Mary O. Tanner; Mrs. Fanny Cuscaden; Mrs. Julia A. Harri 
There are now living fifty-five grandchildren, counting the husbanc 
and wives; thirty-three great grandchildren, and over 100 descendant 
all living near Tampa, including those who have married into tr 
family. One son of Joseph and Mary, F. M. Robles, is the preser 
Judge of the Sixth Judicial Circuit. This circuit includes Hilh 
borough, Pasco and Pinellas Counties. Judge F. M. Robles wa 
born February 26, 1858. He graduated from the law department c 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 29 

University of Michigan in 1890. After practicing law for a 
he became inspector of cattle for Hillsborough County. He was 
ted to the office of County Judge in 1901. He married Katie S. 
kley, of Indiana. 

SPENCER — William Samuel Spencer came to Tampa in 1846 

q Savannah, Ga., with his family. His wife was formerly Emily 

inda Kendrick, of Darien, Ga. Attracted by the beautiful waters 

he bay, and especially by the springs now called Palma Ceia, Mr. 

ncer settled with his family at this spring, on Tampa Bay. He 

led in the spring and was cured of rheumatism from which he 

suffered for many years. After residing here for several years 

noved to the east side of the Hillsborough River. Mr. Spencer 

sheriff of Hillsborough County before the Civil War, and dur- 

it. This same office was held by his son, Thomas Kennedy Spencer, 

i 1893 to 1901. It is a remarkable coincidence that the latter's son, 

C. Spencer, is sheriff at the present time. There were born to 

^iam Samuel Spencer and Emily, his wife, several sons and 

'^liters, as follows: Mrs. Eliza J. (Rev. Henry) Breaker, no 

a! lren survive; William James, who died in service of the Civil 

™'j John Edward, who died from the effects of hardships in service 

ie he war; Mrs. Caroline Elizabeth (W. B.) Henderson, whose off- 

an ig are stated in the account of the Henderson family; Mrs. Mary 

(H. L.) Mitchell, no children. Thomas K., first married his 

in, Mary Spencer, one daughter, Mary, now widow of W. H. Cald- 

, being born to this marriage. After the death of his wife, Thomas 

S0! narried Lizzie Parrish. Children of this marriage are L. V., who 

"vied Hattie Lee Cone; W. C, (Sheriff) who married Paulino Mar- 

jof Georgia; Mrs. Elizabeth (W. F.) Ferman, and Mrs. Pearl King. 

*?» A. (Ferdinand) McLeod was another daughter of William S. 

m 

m 



h 



Emily Spencer, she having died in 1891. Mrs. FAlen Martin 

rles Lucian) Mitchell is the youngest daughter of this first 

n ieer family. Her children are mentioned in the aeeount of the 

■hell family. The two Speneer sons who died in youth, William 

es and John Edward, owned and edited the Tribune, then a weekly 

r of Tampa. After their death Thomas K. took charge of the 

r, afterward giving up his newspaper career for politics. The 



30 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

founder of the Tribune was Simon Turman, the pioneer of the Tur 
family in Tampa. This same Tribune is not in existence now, 
another Tampa Morning Tribune was founded by Colonel W 
Stovall years afterward, the paper being one of the best know 
the State today. 

TURMAN — Simon Turman came from Indiana to Florid;; 
1843, and to Tampa in 1845. He was married here to Mei 
Hooker in 1847. He was at that time a clerk in John Jacks 
store. He was afterward editor of the Tribune, a weekly newspe 
Mr. Turman was Probate Judge at one time. He served in 
Confederate States army as lieutenant, and was killed in the ser 
He left one child, Solon B., who studied law at the University 
Virginia and was admitted to the bar in Tampa in 1887. He 
gaged in the phosphate industry in 1891, retiring from the prar 
of law. He was special commissioner from Florida to the Wo 
Columbian Exposition at Chicago. Mr. Turman returned to the p 
tice of law in 1897 and two years later was appointed solicito i' 
the criminal court of record for this county by Governor Bloxll 
Solon B. married Tillie Lykes in 1897. He died in 1912, leaving 
widow and two children, Almeria and Solon B. Simon Turnn/ 
sister, who came to Tampa with him from Indiana, was Mary, 
she married Colonel John A. Henderson, a lawyer. Their only ii 
is Flora, who married George Waldo, of Brooklyn, N. Y., who bee?! 
a congressman from that district during President Roosevelt's 
ministration. 

WALL-FRIEBELE-CLARKE. These names are very pir 
inent in Tampa's history, and because they are so closely rel 
they are recorded here together. The members of the Wall fa 
are of English ancestry. Perry G. Wall, Sr., came to Heme 
County, Brooksville, Fla., in the year 1845 from Georgia. He i 
ried Barbara Baisden. He became clerk of court of Hamilton Ci 
ty, and was afterwards probate judge of Hamilton and Hillsborc 
Counties. He had his residence in Tampa during the time he 
judge of this county. He died in 1897. To the marriage of P 
G. Sr., and Barbara were born ten children, some of them becor 
very influential in the upbuilding of Tampa. They are Mary Frier 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 31 

Fort Myers; Mrs. Julia (C. L.) Friebele; William W.; Dr. John 
; David H.; Mrs. Sarah (E. A.) Clarke; Mrs. Susan C. (M. E.) 
endry, Judge Joseph B.; Charles F., and Ella. Mrs. Julia (C. L.) 
iebele had three children, Sam, Mary and Nannie. Mary, now Mrs. 
ary F. Dupree, is the only one who survives. William W. Wall, a 

rchant, married Minnie May, of Alabama. Their offspring are 

4:rry G., who married Mattie Houstoun, of Tallahassee, and James 
Igar, who married Florrie Bowman, of Texas. These sons are 

mbers of the hardware firm of Knight & Wall. Dr. John P. Wall, 
prominent physician of the early days of Tampa, who married Miss 
ibanks. Their two sons are John P. Jr., and Charles M. John P. 
, is one of the best known lawyers of the city. He married Lillian 
lite, of Brooksville. David H., a merchant of Brooksville, died 
married in 1864. Mrs. Sarah (E. A.) Clarke still survives her 
^band and only child, Mrs. Flossie (A. J.) Knight. Mrs. Susan C. 
[. E.) Hendry, of Ft. Myers, mother of Edwin M. Hendiy, (unmar- 
'd); Mrs. (Joe) Frazier, Mrs. (Henry) Linebaugh, the late Wall 
ndry, who married Bessie Knight, all of Tampa, and Mrs. Lady 
rah (I. O. R.) Travers, of Ft. Myers. Judge Joseph D. Wall mar- 
J Precious Errington. They were the parents of Mrs. Helen (C. B.) 
rkhill, wife of Judge Parkhill, of Tampa. After the death of his 
e, Judge Wall married Frederica Lykes, who survives him. 
i is a sister of the late Howell T. Lykes, Sr. Charles F. Wall, mer- 
nt of Brooksville, married Susan Mayo. He died 1913. The only 
Id is Mrs. Moss Rose (C. H.) Freeze. Ella Wall, died in childhood. 
S. Friebele, now eighty-two years old, is a remarkable woman and 
arge property holder. She was the first of the Wall family to 
le to Tampa, coming here as a bride, January, 18»52, from Brooks- 
Mr. Friebele was a conspicious figure in pioneer days, and 
led one of Tampa's first stores. There he had a tailoring depart- 
lt and dealt in general merchandise'. It was while Mrs. Friebele's 
er, Sarah Wall, was on a visit to her here that she nut I'. A. 
rke, whom she married in May, 1S(>(). Mr. Clarke was one of the 
able and prosperous merchants Of the early period before and 

r the Civil War. The two sisters influenced the brothers to move 
Tampa, and thus the city gained some of its most enterprising 
prominent citizens. 



City, County, State, U. S. Officials 
and Foreign Consuls 

CITY OFFICIALS 
Mayor — D. B. McKay. 
President of Council — Fred W. Ball. 
City Auditor — J. A. Hansbrough. 
Tax Collector — J. L. Hollingsworth. 
Tax Assessor — Herman H. Regener. 
City Attorney— C. B. Parkhill. 
City Electrician — E. D. Fitzgerald. 
City Physician — Sheldon Stringer, M.D. 
Chief of Police— S. T. Woodward. 
Chief of Fire Department — W. M. Mathews. 
Chief of Sanitation — W. J. Bailey. 
City Clerk — W. A. Johnson. 
Pure Food Inspector — R. I. Gordon. 
Municipal Judge — M. Henry Cohen. 



CITY COUNCIL 



Meetings: Tuesday, 7:30 P. M., of every week. 

First Ward— Fred W. Ball. 

Second Ward — W. J. Houlihan. 

Third Ward— W. J. Chambers. 

Fourth Ward — James E. Etzler. 

Fifth Ward—W. R. Bartlett. 

Sixth Ward — Pedro Ramos. 

Seventh Ward — N. di Maggio. 

Eighth Ward— H. C. Durham. 

Ninth Ward— J. W. Smith. 

Tenth Ward—E. R. Murray. 

Councilman-at-large — O. Falk. 

Reading Clerk — Jack Lawes 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 33 

THE TAMPA BOARD OF TRADE 



OFFICERS 

President — F. C. Bowyer. 

First Vice-Pres. — D. B. McKay. 

Second Vice-Pres. — W. G. Brorein. 

Treasurer — J. M. Harvey. 

Attorney — Thos. E. Lucas. 

Acting Secretary — Lawrence P. Dickie. 
Governors — C. E. Ball, Geo. N. Benjamin, Wm. A. Bonacker, T. 
Ed. Bryan, Chas. H. Brown, M. W. Carruth, Abe Maas, Chester R. 
McFarland, E. W. Monrose, Dr. W. C. Richardson, T. C. Taliaferro, 
W. C. Thomas, J. Edgar Wall, T. M. Wier, J. C. Woodsome. 



TAMPA MERCHANTS' ASSOCIATION 



Organized: December 7, 1911, to further the interests of the 
merchants of Tampa. H. C. Giddens was its first president. 

Location of office, over Court Square Pharmacy. 

The association represents one hundred and eighty-five business 
concerns of the city, and in connection with it, there is a Booster's 
Committee of twenty members. The association has accomplished 
much. It has caused the enactment of eleven city ordinances and 
thirteen State laws in the interest of merchants. It has been the 
means of reducing insurance approximately $25,000 a year. It fosters 
the Gasparilla celebration of 1911 and promoted the recent Tam- 
panama celebration. It has a transportation bureau, making it pos- 
sible for out of town shoppers to secure free transportation to and 
from Tampa. 

OFFICERS 

President Charles A. McKay. 
Vice-Pres. — Fred Wol f. 
Secretary Hafford J one-. 

Treasurer C. M. Davis. 
Board of Governors Thos. I . Kennedy, representing grocers; 



34 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

T. Twomey, dry goods; Ben Freer, druggists; Lee MacDonnell, job 
bers; J. T. Mahoney, furniture dealers; T. N. Henderson, automobilr 
firms; Dan Shea, plumbers; W. H. Beckwith, jewelers; David L 
Thomas, insurance; Adam Katz, clothiers; Carl W. Hill, printers. 



BOARD OF PUBLIC WORKS 



Chairman — D. B. McKay. 

Clerk — Allen Thomas. 

First District — Henry E. Snow. 

Second District — Vacant. 

Third District — Thos. N. Henderson. 

Fourth District — Eugene Holtsinger. 

City Engineer — Ralph D. Martin. 



BOARD OF PORT COMMISSIONERS 



President — M. W. Carruth. 
Secretary — F. C. Bowyer. 
Commissioners — J. A. Griffin, Frank Bentley, W. H. Beckwith,i, 
A. W. Cuscaden, Philip Shore. 



CITY BOARD OF HEALTH 



Chairman — D. B. McKay. 
Clerk — W. A. Johnson. 
Sheldon Stringer, M.D., S. T. Woodward, W. J. Bailey, W. R. 
Bartlett, R. I. Gordon. 



HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY OFFICIALS 



Circuit Court — Judge, F. M. Robles; State's Attorney, George 
P. Raney, Jr.; Clerk, W. P. Culbreath. 



1415208 

TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 35 

Criminal Court — Judge, Lee Gibson; County Solicitor, W. H. 
^Jackson; Clerk, W. S. Cathcart. 

County Court, County Judge's Court, Juvenile Court — Judge, 
E. V. Whitaker; Clerk, W. S. Cathcart; Sheriff, W. C. Spencer; Tax 
Assessor, S. E. Sparkman; Tax Collector, John L. Branch; County- 
Treasurer, J. W. White; Superintendent of Schools, Marshall Moore; 
County Surveyor, George Fuchs; Supervisor of Registration, C. J. 
Bravo; Engineer of Roads, James Riddle. 



STATE OFFICIALS 



Senator — W. F. Himes. 
Representative — W. T. Martin. 



U. S. GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS 



(Meet annually in Tampa) 

U. S. District Court — Judge, R. M. Call, of Jacksonville; Dis- 
trict Attorney, H. S. Phillips, Tampa; Clerk, Eugene D. Dodge, Jack- 
sonville; Marshall, J. C. Brown, Jacksonville; U. S. Court Commis- 
sioner, H. L. Crane, Tampa; U. S. Deputy Clerk, W. R. Watkins, 
Tampa; U. S. Deputy Marshall, L. A. Reynolds, Tampa. 

Custom House Department — Collector, J. D. Calhoun. 

Postoffice — Postmaster, G. W. Bean; Assistant Postmaster, E. 
Gr. Stackpole; Superintendent of Mails, C. L. Patch; Cashier, E. J. 
Yonally; Postoffice Inspector, W. D. Kahn. 

U. S. Immigration Service — Inspector in Charge, W. A. Whalen. 

Weather Bureau — Forecaster — Walter J. Bennett. 

U. S. Engineering Office — Engineer in Charge, Captain O. N. Hie. 



FOREIGN CONSULS 



British Consul — J. \V. Morris, Port Tampa; Lloyd's represen- 
tative for District of Tampa. 

Cuban Consul \i. M. Ybor, third floor Currv Building. 



36 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

French Consul — E. W. Monrose, First National Bank Building 
Vice Consul of Honduras — A. L. Galeano, third floor Curry Bldg,' 
Italian Consul — Captain B. Colombo, 1211 Tampa street. 
Mexican Consul — Rafael Ruesga, Tampa, Fla. 
Norwegian Vice Consul — Barton H. Smith, First National Banli 
Building. 

Acting Spanish Vice Consul — A. F. Nistal, 1420y 2 Seventh Ave 



Benevolent Organizations 



THE ASSOCIATED CHARITIES 



Location — Rooms 313-315 Curry Building. Telephone 1224. 
Maintains Wayside Inn, for the sick and hungry, at 1202 Highl- 
and Avenue; James F. Creamer, Steward. 

OFFICERS 

President — W. G. Rrorein. 
Treasurer — C. C. Burns. 

Secy, and Superintendent — T. T. Cummings. 
Asst. Superintendent — Mrs. T. T. Cummings. 
Directors — Frank Bentley, Salvador Ybor, Herman H. Regener, 
. J. O'Neil, R. M. Ybor, Joaquin Lopez, Judge W. S. Graham, Max 
Moritz, Rev. Smith Hardin, Rev. Claude W. Duke, Rev. J. C. Tims, 
ev. J. D. Lewis, Dr. C. W. Richardson, Dr. L. A. Bize, Dr. J. S. 
[elms, Rabbi Shapo, Dr. U. S. Bird, Julius Maas, Robert Bentley, 
Levkoy, A. Cuesta, R. W. Miller, T. M. Wier, D. H. Sumner, H. 
Giddens, V. Greco, Rev. E. W. Elliott, Rev. J. E. Skinner, Rev. 
eo. W. Weatherby, Rev. F. P. Ensminger, Dr. W. E. Thompson, Dr. 
O. Snow, Dr. J. D. McRae, Dr. C. W. Bartlett, E. W. Monrose, 
, E. Lucas. 



CHILI) KEN'S HOME 

Location: North Florida avenue. Telephone 2122 \. 

Founded: By Miss Carrie Hammerly (now Mrs. John Giddens). 

Incorporated: 1898. 

Meetings: Of the Board, each second Tuesday a1 the Home. 

Present site of two and one-half acres of land donated by Dr. 
•ill, of Palatka, and Hugh C. Macfarlane, of Tampa. The Home 
lilt by citizens. 

Pre8( n/ Matron: Mrs. I .. V. Cull. 

During the past years a boys 1 dining room was added to the 



38 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

dormitory and some of the back porch was screened for the nurser; 
and other improvements were made. 

OFFICERS 

President — Mrs. Abe Maas. 
First Vice-Pres. — Mrs. J. M. Grantham. 
Second Vice-Pres. — Mrs. Eugene Holtsinger. 
Cor.-Sec. — Mrs. G. B. Reynolds. 
Recording Secy. — Mrs. J. T. Gunn. 
Treasurer — Mrs. J. R. Mickler. 
Directors — Messrs. M. W. Carruth, chairman; H. L. Knight, I. !! 
Giddens, Joaquin Lopez, J. Q. Brantley and Mrs. Joaquin Lopez. 



DORCAS SOCIETY 



Organized: March, 1902, for philanthropic work. 
Meetings: First and third Tuesdays in the month, at homes ci 
the members. The idea of organizing the society originated with til 
late Dr. Orpha Bruce, who knew that the Children's Home was ;l 
need of clothing. About twenty-five women met and organized. Tlt ( 
members sew for charity at the meetings, closing with a social houu 

President — Mrs. Harry. Howard. 

Vice-Pres. — Mrs. A. D. Whaley. 

Second Vice-Pres. — Mrs. N. O. Thompson. 

Secretary — Mrs. Emaline Sage. 

Treasurer — Mrs. W. J. Berry. 

Reporter for Tribune — Miss Hutchinson. 

Reporter for Times — Mrs. Harry Howard. 



THE HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY 



Organized: In March, 1911. 

Headquarters: Tampa, Florida, 108 Eagle street. 

Incorporated: August, 1912. 

Regular Meetings: First Wednesday in each Month. 

Annual Meetings: First Wednesday in April. 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 39 

During the time since its organization, this society has done a vast 
imount of good. It has given relief to nearly seven thousand animals, 
,nd three hundred children. 

OFFICERS 

President — Mrs. Jennie Weller, telephone 2578-A 
Secretary — Mrs. C. J. Huber. 
Treasurer — Mrs. Maude Harter. 
Humane Officer — H. B. Johnson. 
Board of Directors — F. D. Jackson, W. B. Williams, J. L. Reed, 
SDr. Mills, Dr. L. G. Larner. 



OLD PEOPLES' HOME 



tt 



Location: Hampton and Morgan streets, the Garrison ; telephone 

First Opened: September 20, 1899, at 404 Washington street. 

Incorporated: As the Old Peoples' Home, May 5, 1903. 

Section II of Charter: This corporation is a charitable associa- 
on, and has no capital stock and no stockholders. Its purpose is to 
tablish, maintain and conduct a comfortable home for worthy aged, 
oth men and women. 

Its first President was Mrs. Sarah McCampbell. Finally a lot 
as purchased, and a building erected through the generosity of the 
laritable people of Tampa. The present matron is Miss Charlotte 
arson. 

BOARD OF MANAGERS 

President— Mrs. U. S. Bird, 702 Lafayette street; telephone 739-L. 

Vice-Presidents — Mrs. Frank Bentley and Mrs. Harry Johnson. 

Treasurer — Mrs. W. W. Jones. 

Secretary — Mrs. J. A. M. Grable. 

Auditor — D. H. Sumner. 

Other Members— Mrs. W. G. Brorein, Mrs. X. G. Carter, Mrs. 

ela Thompson. Directors — Abe Maas, Chairman ;H. C. Giddena, W. 

. Gallaher, C. J. Hutchinson, I). S. Sumner. 



40 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AXD PIONEERS, 1914? 

WOMANS' CHRISTIAN TEMPERANCE UNION 



Meetings: Mothers' meetings, first Wednesday; business, seconi 
Wednesday; program, fourth Wednesday. Executive, devotional ann 
special, at call. 

Place: Mothers' meetings arranged by Superintendent. A 
other meetings in lecture room of the First Baptist Church. 

Time: Mothers' meetings, 3:30 p. m. All others, 3:00 p. m. 

Annual Meeting: Second Wednesday in October. 

OFFICERS 

President — Mrs. J. B. Stevens, 2302 Highland Ave., Phon. 

2069-L. 
Vice-Pres.-at-Large — Mrs. Alfredo Diaz. 
Cor. Secy. — Mrs. Mary McConnell. 
Recording Secy. — Mrs. S. E. Hope. 
Treasurer — Mrs. O. D. Wetherell. 

Superintendents — Work Among Foreign Speaking People, Mrl 
Alfredo Diaz; Work Among Colored People, Mrs. Lida Player; Sun/ 
day School Work, Mrs. W. D. Whitaker; Circulation of National OH\ 
ficial Papers and the Press, Mrs. Eva Pimm; Medal Contest Worli 
Mrs. G. L. McRea; Evangelistic, Mrs. T. D. Jones; Mothers' Meeting;: 
Mrs. T. J. Carruthers; Purity, Rescue and Union Station Work- 
Mrs. C. H. Haas; Flower Mission, Mrs. C. L. Brandon; Wort 
Among Railroad Employees, Mrs. Edith Fitch; Purity, Literaturi 
and Art, Mrs. Lelia Thompson; Social Meetings and Red Lette 
Days, Mrs. J. B. Moody; Juvenile Court, Miss Mary Taylor; Musicaaj 
Temperance and Anti-Narcotics, Miss Dora Karn; Young People' 
Branch, Mrs. F. C. Crowe; Fairs and Open Air Meetings, Mrs. Florr 
ence Chamberlain. 



WOMAN'S HOME AND HOSPITAL 



Location: No. 105 Ross avenue. Telephone 309. 
Founded: Summer of 1898. 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 41 

MEMBERS OF BOARD 

President — Mrs. J. W. Gilmore, 607 Twiggs street; tel- 
ephone 452. 
Vice-Pres. — Mrs. S. C. DeGarmo. 
Recording Secy. — Mrs. T. L. Karn. 
Corresponding Secy. — Mrs. J. A. Mellon. 
Treasurer — Mrs. L. W. Weedon. 
Superintendent — Miss Elizabeth Davis. 
Workers — Miss Ruby D. Taylor, Mrs. M. J. Gramling. 
Directors — H. E. Adams, C. C. Burns, Frank Jackson. 



THE TAMPA CIVIC ASSOCIATION 



In the spring of 1911 some progressive women of "The American 

Oman's League," feeling the need of civic pride and action in 

mpa, petitioned that a Civic Circle be formed in the Tampa Chap- 

[nj\ Later, realizing that independence would increase the usefulness 

the society, "The Tampa Civic Association" was organized, with 

! purpose of cultivating higher ideals of civic life and beauty — 

rb promotion of improvement of home and community surroundings 

gsd the betterment of living conditions. 

The membership comprises three classes — general, .sustaining 
rljd active. The active members are women, but the associate mem- 
inrship also includes men. 

Admitted to Florida Federation of Women's Clubs, Oct. 23, 1912. 
aijnliated with the American Civic Association, April, 1912. 

Meetings: First and third Mondays of each month at 3:00 p. in., 
the Women's Club House, Planl Park. 
Club Year: October to May. 

During the year of 1913 the active membership increased from 
'enty-five members to oar hundred and seventeen. The past >« n 
s been one of enterprise and action. The first annual "Colonial 
ill" was given; a "Colonial Tea" followed, and other >pecial events 
re the "Mower Show and Market," and firs! "Demonstration Fair.* 1 
ie annual May festival was held for the children, and on Maj i. 



42 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

"Post Card Day" was observed. Through the efforts of the associat 
the city council purchased three playgrounds in the congested U 
ment districts. Lectures and stereopticon exhibits of a civic nat 
were given in the city under the auspices of the association. 

OFFICERS 

President — Miss Kate V. Jackson. 

First Vice-Pres. — Mrs. W. S. Oppenheimer. 

Second Vice-Pres. — Mrs. G. B. Reynolds. 

Corresponding Secy. — Mrs. C. E. Isbell. 

Recording Secy. — Mrs. C. E. Sage. 

Treasurer — Mrs. C. C. Worthington. 
Executive Committee — Miss Kate V. Jackson, Mrs. G. B. Renl 
olds, Mrs. H. Waterman, Mrs. W. B. Powell, Mrs. J. J. Elliston, MI 
W. S. Oppenheimer, Mrs. C. E. Isbell, Mrs. E. C. Sage, Mrs. J. 
Worthington, Mrs. J. P. Fox, Mrs. P. P. Lastinger. 

Advisory Council — Hon. S. M. Sparkman, Hon. D. B. McKJ 
Dr. W. P. Crigler, T. E. Lucas, J. E. Wall, E. Berger, Dr. Wm. 
Richardson, T. M. Wier, W. S. Oppenheimer, Samuel Borchardt. 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

Membership — Mrs. F. M. Robles, Chairman; Mrs. Tom Gibbon 
Mrs. P. P. Lastinger, Mrs. Julia Hanks, Mrs. Margaret Goebel. 

Outdoor Art and Gardens — Mrs. P. P. Lastinger, Chairma: 
Mrs. F. M. Robles, Miss Agnes Everett, Mrs. C. Nix, Miss Jesj 
Wauchope, Mrs. W. L. Hanks, Mrs. J. B. Gerald. 

Junior Society — Mrs. J. P. Fox, Chairman; Mrs. W. B. Powe 
Mrs. Fred Wolf, Miss Boerger. 

Public Health — Mrs. W. S. Oppenheimer, Chairman; Mrs. 3 
Waterman, Mrs. J. J. Elliston, Mrs. F. M. Robles, Mrs. E. C. Sag 
Mrs. Lizzie T. Davis, Mrs. J. L. Hollingsworth. 

Program — Mrs. W. B. Powell, Chairman; Miss Kate V. Jackso 
Mrs. W. S. Oppenheimer. 

Parks and Playgrounds — Mrs. G. B. Reynolds, Chairman; Mi 
R. L. Marcum, Mrs. Abe Maas, Mrs. J. P. Fox, Mrs. J. E. Worthing 
ton, Mrs. C. E* Isbell, Mrs. P. P. Lastinger. 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 43 



Publicity — Mrs. J. E. Worthington, Chairman; Mrs. Pauline 
3wne Hazen, Miss Frances Cornelia Magruder. 

Community Development and Municipal Improvement — The Ex- 
tive Committee. 



WOMAN'S CITY CLUB 



Organized : April 30, 1902, as Club of Current Events. 

Entered General Federation, February 3, 1903; State Federation, 
vember 4, 1903. After ten years as Club of Current Events, dur- 
; which time it mothered the first child labor law, fire protection 
• public schools and plan for local option compulsory education, on 
igust 5, 1913, changed its name to the Woman's City Club, and 
joys the distinction of having one of its members, Miss Elizabeth 
kew, chosen as one of the five delegates to represent Florida at the 
nnial convention at Chicago in 1914. At present the club main- 
ns a free rest room for women and children of Tampa, also for 
)ppers and visitors to the city, at 616 Florida avenue. 

Meetings: The club meets fortnightly, 3:00 p. m., Tuesdays, at 
5 Rest Room. 

OFFICERS 

President — Mrs. C. J. Huber. 
First Vice-Pres. — Mrs. S. J. Gebhart. 
Second Vice-Pres. — Mrs. Isabel Ware. 
Corresponding Secy. — Miss Elizabeth Askew. 
Recording Secy. — Mrs. P. P. Wood. 
Treasurer — Mrs. M. M. Dobson. 
Superintendent— Miss S. J. McLaws. 



YOUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



The movement for a Young Men's Christian Association building 
r Tampa was started in 190/i when the Initial subscription of $$,500 
made by the late J. M. Long. After his decease, January 17 of 

following year, it was discovered that he had bequeathed the 



44 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 



Association the splendidly located lot, 105x105 feet, on the nor 
west corner of Florida avenue and Zack street. 

June 6, 1906, J. M. Graham was called to take up the ac 
duties of General Secretary of the Association. A building o 
mittee was appointed and thereafter a canvass for funds was e 
ducted. On August 27, 1907, the Association was incorporated. f 
cornerstone was laid February 5, 1909, with imposing ceremonies i* 
a splendid address by the Hon. William Jennings Bryan. 

The building was opened for Association activities October 
1910, and was dedicated October 9 with religious ceremonies, 
address being made by Hon. W. B. Stubbs, of Savannah, Geor^J' 

The cost of the building and furnishings amounted to $145,( 
and it is thoroughly equipped for the Association purposes. The As 
ciation is doing a wonderful work in its educational department, 
well as in its religious, physical, social and boy's activities. It 1 
practical study courses and excellent instructors. 

DIRECTORS 

President — Frank Bentley. 
Vice-Pres. — Dr. Wm. C. Richardson. 
Recording Secy. — H. E. Adams. 
Treasurer — I. S. Giddens. 
Asst. Treasurer — Dr. W. A. Dean. 

Other Directors — D. C. McMullen, G. E. Mabry, J. Edgar Was 
C. B. Witt, W. J. Barritt, H. C. Giddens, F. D. Jackson, R. \ 
Miller, Lee MacDonnell, John G. Anderson, Jr. 

TRUSTEES 

Chairman, D. C. McMullen; Secretary, J. M. Graham; Treasure 
G. E. Mabry. Other Trustees, I. S. Giddens, Frank Bentley, W. 1 
Gray, G. A. McLeod, W. T. Martin, H. J. Watrous, S. L. Lowry. 

EXECUTIVE OFFICERS 

General Secretary, J. M. Graham; Physical Director, W. 1 
Stippich; Membership Secretary, Frederick Shannon; Boys' Secr< 
tary, R. J. Charles; Religious Work Secretary, A. F. Turner; Ofii< 
Secretary, A. H. Smith. 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 45 

YOUNG WOMAN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

Location: 1007 Florida avenue, the parsonage of the First Meth- 
Pl t church having been leased for 1913-14. Telephone 2087-A. 

>|The organization was perfected February 6, 1913, by Miss Ada 

kweather, Field Secretary. The first definite idea of organizing 

an association for Tampa began with members of a mission 

! y class of twelve women, who met at the home of Mrs. Frank 

a ;ley, in the fall of 1912. After correspendence with Miss Anna 

:r, executive secretary for the Provisional South Atlantic Terri- 

1 committee of the National Board of Y. W. C. A., at Char- 

, N. C, it was arranged that Miss Starkweather should come to 

r , in the work of organization. A meeting was called November 

K it the residence of Mrs. Bentley by a number of representative 

J en. Miss Starkweather was present, and explained the methods 

• rganizing. 

I Mrs. L. L. Buchanan was elected provisional chairman, and 
-men of the different working committees were appointed as 
ws: Membership, Mrs. A. C. Clewis; Finance, Mrs. F. C. 
yer; House, Mrs. Thomas Palmer; Constitution, Mrs. U. S. Bird; 
ination, Mrs. W. C. Bigger. Each chairman appointed several 
tants and all the committees set earnestly to work, with the result 
rganization night as follows: 

Total seven hundred and twenty-five charter members, including 
ty-seven life members, dues $100 for life; forty-seven sustaining 
bers, dues $5 each per year; six hundred regular members and 
■one junior members with dues at $1 per year. 

The chairman of the finance committee reported $402 in the 
;ury, $1,000 ready to be paid on demand, $^?,18i pledged to be 
within the year 1913— total, $4,186. The splendid work thus 
n has steadily increased. There are now over 1,000 members. 

prom sixty to eighty business women take their lunches at the 
eria daily. The religious, business, physical and social depart- 
s are growing in helpfulness. 



irt 



46 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

OFFICERS 

President — Mrs. Lee MacDonell. 

First Vice-Pres. — Mrs. W. C. Bigger. 

Second Vice-Pres. — Mrs. J. M. Long. 

Third Vice-Pres.— Mrs. U. S. Bird. 

Fourth Vice-Pres. — Mrs. L. L. Buchanan. 

Corresponding Secy. — Mrs. J. E. Wall. 

Recording Secy. — Mrs. C. B. Witt. 

Treasurer — Mrs. O. D. Wetherell. 
Directors — Mrs. Frank Bentley, Mrs. Frank Jackson, Mrs. fij 
Lowry, Mrs. R. R. Brown, Mrs. Elizabeth Carew, Mrs. W. R. Fn 
Mrs. W. G. Brorein, Mrs. H. P. Inabnett, Mrs. Thomas Palmer, 
A. E. Berry, Mrs. Barron Phillips, Mrs. F. C. Bowyer, Mrs. A 
Clewis. 

Trustees — H. E. Adams, Frank Bentley, Dr. L. A. Bize, £5 
Lowry, Lee MacDonell, R. W. Miller, Clyde Perry. 

Chairmen of Committees — Vesper Service, Mrs. Barron PhiLi 
Mission Study, Mrs. R. R. Brown: Bible Study, Mrs. J. M. G> 
tham; Finance, Mrs. F. C. Bowyer; House and Cafeteria, Mrs. The 1 
Palmer; Membership, Mrs. W. L. Ligat; Business Women, Mrs. 
A. Mobley; Educational, Mrs. J. C. Tims; Physical Education, 
Johnnie Rutland; Social, Mrs. J. C. McKay; Library, Mrs. S3 
Lowry. 

Secretaries — General Secretary, Miss Margaret C. Hayes; B'j 
ical Director, Miss Ruby Leon Marcum; House Secretary, Mrs 
U. Pou. 



Hitsoric and Patriotic 



THE CLUB OF COLONIAL DAMES OF TAMPA 



Organized: By Mrs. S. L. Lowry, Tampa, Florida, February 8, 

Meetings: At homes of members. 

This club is composed of Colonial Dames from various States, 
residing in Tampa, are necessarily cut off from the privileges of 
own State societies. Its purpose is social and educational. It 
strives to promote and stimulate interest in the general Society 
'olonial Dames and to extend courtesies to Dames temporarily 
ing or visiting in the city. Visiting Dames are requested to make 
selves known to any member of the club. 

Only women who are already Colonial Dames of good standing 

eir own States are eligible to membership in the club of Colonial 

es of Tampa. The cosmopolitan nature of Tampa has made the 

|aization of this club advisable. It is the only club of the kind 

ng except that of Washington, D. C. 

harter Members — President, Mrs. S. L. Lowry, of Florida So- 
of Colonial Dames; Secretary, Mrs. Langdon Caskin, of Penn- 
nia Society of Colonial Dames; Mrs. Willis J. Milner, of Ala- 
Society of Colonial Dames; Miss Jenny Babbitt, of Vermont 
ty of Colonial Dames. 

Later Members — Mrs. Mary Clara Milner, of Alabama Society 
olonial Dames; Mrs. Perry Wall, of Florida Society Colonial 
es; Mrs. Frederick W. Waite (Palmetto, Fla.), of Florida Society 
Gonial Dames; Mrs. Edward Dickenson, of Alabama Society of 
lial Dames. 



DAUGHTERS OF AMERICAN REVOLUTION 



DbSOTO CHAPTER 

Organized: About l<)o:$, by Mrs. James McKay, Sr. 



48 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

Mrs. Mahoney, State Regent, appointed Mrs. M. W. Carrut 
re-organize the Chapter in 1910. 

Meetings: Second Tuesdays from October to May. 

President General — Mrs. William Cumming Story. 
Members of National Committees from DeSoto Chapter — Mr* 
W. Carruth, Tampa, Conservation, Memorial Continental Hall, 
servation of the Home; Mrs. Hugh C. Macfarlane, Tampa, Histo 
research and Preservation of Records. 

State Officers — Regent, Mrs. G. C. Frizell, Miami; Vice-Rejii 
Mrs. M. W. Carruth, Tampa; Secretary and Treasurer, Miss C. 
Keuren, St. Augustine; Historian, Miss Annie Lock, Jacksonville. 
Members of State Committees from DeSoto Chapter — Welfai 
Women and Children, Mrs. M. W. Carruth, chairman; Revisioij 
State By-Laws, Mrs. Hugh C. Macfarlane, chairman. 
Regent — Mrs. Hugh C. Macfarlane. 
Vice-Regent — Mrs. H. P. Inabnett. 
Recording Secy. — Miss Rosa C. Fishburne. 
Corresponding Secy. — Mrs. E. L. Robinson 
Treasurer — Mrs. Carl W. Hill. 
Registrar — Mrs. H. J. Watrous. 
Historian — Mrs. T. O. Gibbons. 
Charter Members — Mrs. Helene Turton McKay, Mrs. Sara Ml 
Carruth, Mrs. Nellie Watrous Semonite Hill, Mrs. Eunice Edw 
Lackey (real daughter), Mrs. Annie Morris Givens, Mrs. Mary SS 
Parsons, Mrs. Sidney Brown Gibbons, Mrs. Mary L. Edwards If 
Mrs. Clara Keys McDonald, Mrs. Nancy Y. Turton, Mrs. Cz 
Blowers Lough, Mrs. Annie G. Fripp, Miss Louise Frances Dodge 



UNITED DAUGHTERS OF CONFEDERACY 
TAMPA CHAPTER NO. 113 



Organized: June, 1897. There are over 100 active members. 

OFFICERS 

President — Mrs. Amos H. Norris. 
Vice-Pres. — Mrs. E. O. Johnson. 



l; ! 



Organized: June 17, 1913, for the purpose of studying German 
1 for social purposes. Club colors blue and gold; the forget-me- 
: the chosen flower, and the emblem a wreath of forget-me-nots with 
d band across the center engraved with name of club. 

Charter members Misses May C. Orr, Will Eva Caruthers, Mary 
fcter and Henrietta Chaires. The honorary member of the club is 
ss Elsie Hoyt, who instructs the members in their study of the 
rman language. 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 49 

Second Vice-Pres. — Mrs. H. O. Snow. 
Recording Secy. — Mrs. T. H. Atkinson. 
Corresponding Secy. — Mrs. H. Brash. 
Treasurer — Mrs. P. P. Wood. 
Historian — Mrs. E. E. Salter. 



VERGISSMEINNICHT VEREIN 



UNITED SPANISH WAR VETERANS 
GENERAL JOE WHEELER CAMP NO. 2 



Meetings: First Monday in each month, at 909 y 2 Florida avenue. 
Date of Charter: January 30, 1911. 

National Headquarters: No. 35 Nassau street, New York City. 
Headquarters for Department of Florida: Tampa, Florida. 

OFFICERS OF CAMP NO. 2 

Commander — W. A. Joughin, Box 22. 
Senior Vice-Command e ?•— Leroy Rhodes. 
Junior Vice-Commander — W. J. May. 
Adjutant — Franklin Heinrich. 
Quartermaster George C. Kelly, 
Officer of the Guard — O. S. Allen. 
Chaplain- John Muench. 
Historian G. F. McWilliams. 
Surgeon— Dr. W. P, Crigler. 






50 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

Quartermaster Sergeant — Thomas Crozier. 

Color Sergeants — Thomas Crozier, R. L. Starlings. 
Tampans who are State Officers: Department Commai-der, M 
A. Joughin; Department Adjutant, Franklin Heinrich; Departme 
Q. M., O. S. Allen; Department Dist. Inspector, L. R. Eddings; D) 
partment Surgeon, W. P. Crigler. 



Literary and Musical Clubs 



DRAPER SELF-CULTURE CLUB 



HYDE PARK CIRCLE 

Organized: June, 1913. 

Meetings: Alternate Tuesdays at Hyde Park School House. 

Object: General culture and training of children in home and 
chools, and to bring mothers and teachers in closer touch with each 
ther, in their joint work of aiding the development of children's 
laracter as well as education. The membership numbers thirty-five. 

OFFICERS 

President— Mrs. J. H. Westfall. 

Vice-Pres. — Mrs. Morris Wolf. 

Second Vice-Pres. — Mrs. M. Henry Cohen. 

Third Vice-Pres. — Mrs. Albert Thornton. 

Secretary — Mrs. C. O. Mills. 

Treasurer — Mrs. J. A. Walters. 

Press Reporter — Mrs. W. T. Morgan. 



TAMPA HEIGHTS CIRCLE 

Organized : July, 1913. 
Meetings: At homes of members. 

OFFICERS 

President — Mrs. Thomas E. Mercer. 
Vice-Pres. — Mrs. A. L. Crumpton. 
Secretary — Miss Anna Van Roe. 
Treasurer — Mrs. Ethel Robles. 
Press Reporter Mrs. W. A. Woodfin. 



FRIDAY MORNING MUSIC Ml 



Organized: October 1902, by Mrs. Kate C. Ferris and Miss 

ranees Louise Dodge. 



59 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

Meetings: Alternate Friday mornings, at 10 o'clock, from th« 
last Friday in October to the last Friday in April. 

Former Presidents: Mrs. W. H. Ferris, 1902-1907; Mrs. Howel 
Lykes, Jr., 1907-8; Mrs. E. H. Hart, 1908-10; Mrs. G. N. Patterson 
1910-13. 

There are one hundred and fifty members, the club being the sec 
ond largest in the State. The membership was limited to twenty 
five at first, and the meetings were held at the homes of the member: 
until the club outgrew this. It then met at the Crescent Club anc 
later at the Elk's Club for a number of years. Last season the meet- 
ings were held at the German-American Club, and this season alt, 
"The Castle." There were twenty charter members. 

Charter Members — Miss Frances Louise Dodge, Mrs. W. H. Fer- 
ris, Mrs. J. A. M. Grable, Mrs. Charles Marshall, Mrs. G. N. Patter- 
son, Mrs. W. R. Fuller, Mrs. E. H. Hart, Mrs. D. F. Conoley, Miss 
Annie Macfarlane, Miss Kathleen Phillips, Miss Lulette Richardson 
Miss Edna Ball, Miss Ellie Sparkman, Mrs. Jack Reeve, Mrs.] 
Thomas Palmer, Mrs. Otto Stallings, Mrs. W. A. Carter, Mrs. C. S 
Eliot, Mrs. W. E. Padgett, Mrs. John Berry. Those admitted to com-w 
plete the first twenty-five members were Mrs. E. V. Whitaker, Mrs 
M. W. Carruth, Miss Edith Nash, Miss Claire Wooldridge, Miss Maryy 
Spencer. 

President — Mrs. R. J. Binnicker. 

First Vice-Pres. — Miss Hulda Kreher. 

Second Vice-Pres. — Mrs. M. M. Taylor. 

Secretary — Mrs. E. Lyle Griffin. 

Treasurer — Mrs. C. S. Eliot. 

Musical Director — Mrs. E. H. Hart. 

Chorus Director — Mrs. John Trice. 

Chorus Accompanist — Mrs. Frank Cooper. 

Librarian — Mrs. Ottis Wallace. 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

Program — Mrs. E. H. Hart, Mrs. R. M. Prince, Miss Hulda 
Kreher, Mrs. Carl W. Hill, Mrs. W. H. Ferris. 

Boom — Mrs. J. M. Wilkes, Mrs. Bayard Mitchell, Miss Adrian 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 53 

Morales, Mrs. W. B. Dickinson, Mrs. E. A. Dunn, Mrs. Alonzo Mc- 
Mullen. 

Ushers — Miss Leola Stafford, Miss Gertrude McFadden, Miss 
A.nnie Louise Scarlett, Miss Hortense Oppenheimer, Miss Carlotta 
'Wetherell, Mrs. Carl Whitaker. 



STUDENTS' ART CLUB 



Organized: June 30, 1902, by Miss Louise Frances Dodge and 
Mrs. W. T. Lesley (now Mrs. C. C. Martin), at Mrs. Lesley's home. 

Charter Members — Miss Irma Bettis, Mrs. B. A. Brown, Mrs. A. 
. Clewis, Miss Louise Frances Dodge, Mrs. W. L. Douglas, Mrs. W. 
Et. Fuller, Miss Isabel Garrett, Mrs. Hunt, Mrs. S. B. Leonardi, Mrs. 
N. T. Lesley, Mrs. J. M. Long, Mrs. H. C. McNeer, Mrs. Shipman, 
A\ss Ellie Sparkman, Mrs. J. M. Towne, Miss Lottie Watkins. 

Admitted to the American Federation of Arts, May, 1911. 

Former Presidents — Mrs. M. L. Douglas, elected June, 1902 ; Mrs. 
s 4. L. Douglas, reelected January, 1903; Miss Mary Lee Douglas (now 
ilrs. W. L. Ligat), elected November, 1903; Miss Isabel Garrett, (now 
4rs. F. W. Morse), elected November, 1904; Mrs. J. M. Long, elected 
•November, 1905; resigned office January, 1906, account of illness; Miss 
Cathleen Phillips elected January, 1906, resigned office May same 
ear, account of illness; Miss Lottie Watkins, then Vice-President, 
r as elected to fill vacancy, May, 1906; Miss Isabel Garrett, elected 
November, 1906; Mrs. J. M. Long, elected November, 1907; Mrs. S. 
V. Graham, elected November, 1908; Mrs. J. M. Long, elected Novem- 
er, 1909; Mrs. J. M. Long, reelected June, 1910; Mrs. A. C. Clewis, 
ected June, 1911; Mrs. A. C. Clewis, reelected June, 1912. 

OFFICERS 

President — Mrs. T. L. Karn. 
Vice-President — Mrs. W. H. Fuller. 
Second Vice-Pres.—^lrs. C. B, Bryan. 
Recording Secy. — Mrs. Oscar Windhorst. 
Corresponding Secy. — Miss Frankey Hamblin. 

Treasurer Mrs. F. \V. Morse. 
Librarian Miss Virginia Coe Wood. 



ill 



54 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

Program Committee — Mrs. T. L. Karn, Mrs. Walter Bettis, Mr; 
F. W. Morse, Miss Johnnie Rutland. 

Room Committee — Mrs. R. P. Burton, Miss Virginia Wood, Mrs 
J. C. Martin, Miss Minerva Hamblin. 

Reception Committee — Mrs. A. C. Clewis, Mrs. S. B. Leonard: 
Mrs. Pauline B. Hazen, Mrs. C. C. Martin, Mrs. T. Roy Young, Mr* 
J. M. Long, Miss Johnnie Rutland. 

Exhibit Committee — Mrs. W. F. Himes, Mrs. R. P. Burton, Mrd 
J. C. Martin, Mrs. S. W. Graham, Miss Lottie E. Watkins, Mr.^ 
Eugene Holtsinger, Mrs. Frank Bentley, Mrs. A. R. Beyer. 

Refreshment Committee— Mrs. C. P. Fuller, Mrs. G. F. O'Brier 
Mrs. J. M. Towne, Mrs. L. V. Spencer. 

Music Committee — Miss Virginia Hill Smith, Miss Kathleen Phili 
lips, Miss Minerva Hamblin. 



TAMPA WOMAN'S CLUB 



Organized: 1900, by Mrs. M. W. Carruth, Mrs. Thomas IL 
Shackleford, now of Tallahassee; Mrs. A. E. Dick, now of New Yorkkj 

Meetings: Alternate Thursday afternoons, at 3:00 o'clock, bet: 
ginning the first Tuesday in November and ending with the annua* 
meeting the last of April. 

Affiliated with Florida State Federation of Womens' Clubs, Noi 
vember, 1913. 

Charter Members: Mrs. T. L. Shackleford, Mrs. M. W. CarrutH 
Mrs. A. E. Dick, Mrs M. L. Douglas, Mrs. Senour, Mrs. F. M 
Sprague, Mrs. M. G. Gibbons, Mrs. S. B. Leonardi, Mrs. J. M. Longs 
Mrs. H. E. Adams. 

Former Presidents — Mrs. E. A. Dick, 1900-1901 ; Mrs. E. A. Dick^ 
1901-1902; Mrs. P. W. Smith, 1902-1903; Mrs. M. L. Douglas, 1903 
1904; Mrs. O. D. Wetherell, 1904-1905; Mrs. J. C. Calhoun, 1905-1906 
Mrs. Thomas Palmer, 1905-1906; Mrs. M. L. Douglas, 1906-1907; Mrs 
J. H. Fessender, 1907-1908; Mrs. J. A. Hansbrough, 1908-1909; Mrs 
E. W. Shaw, 1909-1910; Mrs. Barron Phillips, 1910-1911; Mrs. H. P 
Inabnett, 1911-1912; Mrs. W. W. Jones, 1912-1913. 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 55 

OFFICERS 

President — Mrs. P. W. Smith. 
Vice-Pres. — Mrs. J. D. MacRae. 
Recording Secy. — Mrs. Amos Norris. 
Corresponding Secy. — Mrs. J. B. Gerald. 
Treasurer — Mrs. F. C. Bowyer. 
Librarian — Miss Sarah Downs. 
Auditor — Mrs. J. C. McKay. 
Board of Managers: For one year — Mrs. L. L. Buchanan, Mrs. 
H. Pratt; for two years, Mrs. A. C. Moore, Mrs. C. R. McFarland; 
three years, Mrs. J. B. Anderson, Mrs. E. W. Shaw. 

STANDING COMMITTEES 

Program — Mrs. J. D. MacRae, Chairman; Mrs. Amos Norris, 
s. W. L. Ligat. 

Library — Miss Sarah Downs, Chairman; Mrs. John Sherman; 
s. George McKean. 

Book — Mrs. C. R. Knight, Chairman; Miss Sarah Downs. 

Press — Mrs. J. D. MacRae, Chairman; Mrs. R. A. Ellis, Mrs. 
r P. Burton. 

i Social — Mrs. J. C. McKay, Chairman; Mrs. C. R. McFarland, 
s. A. C. Moore, Mrs. Lee McDonnell; Mrs. D. B. Givens, Mrs. ,7. 
Seckinger, Mrs. W. W. Jones. 

Parliamentary — Mrs. E. W. Shaw, Chairman; Mrs. Barron Phil- 
;, Mrs. John Hansbrough. 

Music — Mrs. L. L. Buchanan, Chairman; Mrs. H. P. Inabnett, 
s. John Hansbrough, Mrs. S. I>. Lowry, Mrs. O. D. Wetherell. 

Room ---First three months. M rs. J. B. Anderson, Chairman; Mrs. 
M. Pons, Mrs. J. M. Towne, Mrs. W. C. Bigger, Mrs. G. A. Pette- 
y, Mrs. C. Boulware; second three months, Mrs. C. H. McFarland, 
lirman; Mrs. R, P. Henderson, Mrs. H. S. Hampton, Mrs. .1. M. 
rvey, Mrs. W. A. Adams, Mrs. E. K. Nelson. 

Good Works — Mrs. A. C. Moore, Chairman; Mrs. J. M. Long. 

Floral Mrs. J. II. Pratt, Chairman? Mrs. Frank Bentley, Mrs. 
S. Bird, Mrs. H. I*. Burton, Mrs. H. S. Phillips, Mrs. Oscar Wind- 
It. 



56 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914* 

WOMAN'S REPUBLIC 



Organized: Tampa chapter organized under the name of 11 
American Woman's League, April 29, 1910, by Mrs. Hester E. Pon 

Meetings: Second and fourth Mondays in the month, during II 
winter season, and secon dMonday during the summer, at the R 
Room, corner Florida avenue and Zack street. 

Number of Members: 220. 

Study Courses: Music, Art and Business; open to members. 

OFFICERS 

President — Mrs. Hester E. Porch, 348 Plant avenue; 1 

elephone 822-L. 
Vice-Pres. — Mrs. J. M. Long. 
Second Vice-Pres. — Mrs. J. B. Reynolds. 
Secretary — Mrs. F. M. Robles. 
Treasurer — Mrs. Lizzie T. Davis. 
Executive Committee — Mrs. Jennie Weller, Mrs. Viola Trri 



Social Clubs 



FORTNIGHTLY CLUB 



Organized: October, 1911. 

Meetings: Alternate Wednesdays at home of members at 3:00 
m., its purpose being social enjoyment. Annual meeting in October, 
mual reception second Wednesday in January. 

OFFICERS 

President — Mrs. L. A. Bize. 

Vice-Pres— Mrs. S. C. DeGarmo. 

Secy, and Treasurer — Mrs. J. M. Grantham. 

Press Reporter — Mrs. E. Lyle Griffin. 



SATURDAY CARD CLUB 



Organized: October, 1910. 

Meetings: Saturday afternoons, from fall to spring, at homes of 
imbers. The club has only one officer. 

President — Mrs. D. Collins Gillett. 

CHARTER MEMBERS 

Mrs. A. B. Ballard, Mrs. Walter S. Barret, Mrs. J. C. Boltz, Mrs. 
, H. Ferris, Mrs. William Fielder, Mrs. E. R. Gunby, Mrs. D. C. 
llett, Mrs. W. W. Jones, Mrs. W. L. Ligat, Mrs. Howell T. Lykes, 
., Mrs. L. L. Spafford, Mrs. S. B. Turman, Mrs. John P. Wall, Mrs. 
B. Wallace, Mrs. Alfred Warren. 



TAMPA AUTOMOBILE AND GOLF CLUB 

Location: The handsome club house is located between Tampa 
d Rocky Point, on Grand Central Drive. 

Meetings : Second Thursday evening of each month. 
Incorporated : May 27, 1 910. 



58 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

OFFICERS 

President— T. Ed. Bryan. 
Vice-Pres.—C. E. Ball. 
Secretary — J. H. Bonacker. 
Treasurer — L. L. Buchanan. 
There are 100 charter members. 



TAMPA TENNIS AND CANOE CLUB 



Organized: November, 1913, for both men and women. Tf 
membership now numbers seventy-five active and fifteen honora 
members. 

Meetings: Each second Monday in the month at the club houi 
of this organization, on the Hillsborough River in Plant Park. TH 
club has two fine asphalt courts and games are played daily by mei 
bers. The officers and board of directors constitute the charter men 
bers. 

OFFICERS 

President — W. F. Ferman. 
Vice-Pres. — Howard Martin. 
Secretary — P. J. VanPelt. 
Treasurer — Jerome A. Waterman. 
Board of Directors— W. W. Trice, Tod Gillett, F. M. Andersoo 
G. E. Mabry, O. G. Sexton, Jr., and the officers. 

s 

TAMPA YACHT AND COUNTRY CLUB 



First meeting was held May 14, 1904, in bachelor quarters of W 
E. Dorchester and C. M. Davis; Capt. W. W. Carnes, presiding. 

First election held June 1, 1904, resulting as follows: Presiden 
John Savares; Vice-Pres., A. C. Moore; Treasurer, W. E. Dorchester 
Secretary, C. M. Davis. Same officers were elected at meeting i 
January, 1905. 

New building erected 1910, costing $20,000. Total value of proj 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 59 

over $50,000. This building was enlarged the past year (1913), 
many other improvements were made. 

PRESENT OFFICERS 

President— D. C. Gillett. 
Vice-Pres.— H. T. Lykes. 
Secretary — C. M. Davis. 
Treasurer — R. J. Binnicker. 
Directors — J .C. Woodsome, J. T. Mahoney, W. M. Fielder, J. M. 
srey, M. G. Gibbons. 
] Executive Committee — J. T. Mahoney, C. M. Davis, M. G. 
rJ»ons. 
The membership numbers nearly 400 men. 
_ — . 

WEDNESDAY CLUB 



1 



Organized: 1895. 

Meetings: Each Wednesday during winter season, at homes of 
bers. First began as a book club, and later it was decided to 
i it a whist club. The membership comprises the original six- 
members of the club which has only one officer. 

President — Mrs. L. L. Spafford. 
Charter Members— Mrs. A. B. Ballard, Mrs. W. A. Carter, Mrs. 
rl. Ferris, Mrs. J. H. Fessenden, Mrs. Melville Gibbons, Mrs. A. 
Ioore, Mrs. Thomas Palmer, Mrs. George P. Raney, Jr., Mrs. F. 
olomonson, Mrs. J. B. Seckinger, Mrs. (). J. Spafford, Mrs. L. L, 
Tord, Mrs. T. C. Taliaferro, Mrs. S. B. Turman, Mrs. Joe Wall. 
Perry G. Wall. 



YE MYSTIC KREWE OF GASPARILLA 

Origin of the society: The Gasparilla idea originated in \\v 
ipr of [904, i?i connection with the second May Music Festival 
here. This festival was the forerunner of a number of inv 
ant celebrations, among them being the South Florida and State 

s. 



60 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

The May Festival itself was the idea of Miss Louise Frr 
Dodge, a resourceful newspaper woman, then the society editor o 
Tampa Morning Tribune. Mr. George Hardee, at the reque* 
Miss Dodge, planned the Gasparilla fete as a pageant feature o 
festival. The idea was novel and met with the cooperation of se 
prominent men from the time of its first announcement which 
published in the Tampa Morning Tribune, in the form of a 1 
written by Mr. Hardee to Mr. Edwin D. Lambright, associate ei 
of the Tribune, and was supposed to come from the pirate Gasp* 
himself. It proclaimed that Gasparilla and his Mystic Krewe 
about to invade the city. Mr. Lambright answered this and ! 
ceeding letters in like vein. 

The first Gasparilla celebration was held on May 4, 1904, yi 
fifty prominent Tampa men, wearing gay costumes of pirates, par;} 
the streets on horseback. In the parade there were also many ai 
mobiles and other vehicles, decorated with flowers. On the eve 
of May 6 a brilliant coronation ball was given at the Tampa 
Hotel. Hon. E. R. Gunby was chosen king with much pomp, 
Miss Mary Lee Douglas was crowned Queen. Four other pop;/ 
society girls were chosen Maids of Honor to Her Majesty. The 
ond Gasparilla celebration was held during the South Florida 
in November, 1906, the fair having by that time supplied the pi) 
of the May Festival. A tournament was held previous to the c 
nation ball that year. 

The celebration is now held annually in February, and the 
onation ball is the most brilliant and magnificent of the season's sod 
functions, and costs thousands of dollars. 

HISTORICAL SKETCH OF PIRATE GASPARILLA 

In the romantic days of the Gulf of Mexico, from 1800 to l!l 
when pirate fleets roved up and down, and Jean and Pierre La Fi 
Dominique, Yon and others of their like, held high revels at tl 
rendezvous at Barataria Island, near the passes of the Mississi]! 
a famous pirate named Jose Gasparilla had a beautiful house ffl 
extensive grounds, rose and palm gardens on the island which r 
bears his name. This cruel and bloodthirsty pirate had an eye 
female beauty, however, and when he captured a ship he would s 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 61 

vomen alive and send them ashore to his island prison-house, 
epredations of the Gulf pirates became unbearable, and a United 
s fleet, sent down to punish them, swept them from the sea. 
arilla was captured in Lemon Bay, a branch of Charlotte Har- 
nd hanged from his own yardarm. His beautiful captives were 
red to liberty and after some years his house, a place of such 
men with sailors and fishermen that they never visited it, burst 
flames during a violent thunderstorm and disappeared forever. 

GROWTH OF THE SOCIETY 

"he members of Ye Mystic Krewe of Gasparilla, seeing in their 
*ation immense possibilities for an annual event which would in 
rival the Mardi Gras Carnivals of the Southern cities, set to work 

J :orporate the Krewe. Year by year and step by step, Ye Mystic 
e has developed from a small society to one famed throughout 
itire South. 

'he general myth of Gasparilla and his band has of late years 
followed; the Pirate Krewe arriving in a rakish schooner, with 

liiing guns and with cutlass and pistol, demanded the city keys 
its Chief Executive. 

iter a carnival on the streets and a banquet the Krewe retire 
e Tampa Bay Casino, there to hold the Coronation Ball, at 
, with much splendor and ceremonj^, a young woman is crowned 
1 of the Krewe by the Pirate King already chosen and on his 
e. 

he King, Queen, Maids of Honor and Courtiers are all selected 
aled ballot, which ballot is not even opened until the Coronation 
lonies are begun. 

"he first captain of the Krewe was E. R. Gunby ; the second, G. 
lardee; third, C. M. Davis, and fourth, J. T. Mahoney, who is 
in at the present time. 

PAST K I N(.S AND QUE ENS 

Idward R. Gunby and Miss Mary Lee Douglas (now Mrs. \V. L. 
), 1904. 

Villiain (!. Gait her and Miss Mary Conlcy Carncs (now of 
•his. L906. 



62 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

Penn W. Dawson and Miss Lillian Stevens (now Mrs. 
Dawson), 1907. 

Edward M. Hendry and Miss Kathleen Phillips, 1910. 

Frances Makemsie Anderson and Miss Dorothy Gunby, 191 

Jesse G. Barkley and Miss Stella Taliaferro, 1912. 

Thomas Mayo Lykes and Miss Ruth Trice, (now Mrs. G< 
Booker) 1913. 

William Reynolds Beckwith and Miss Mary Cotter Lucas, 

Maids of Honor, 1914 — Miss Margaret Fuller, Miss Cora \ 
derson, Miss Lilias Pratt, Miss Barbara Parkhill. 

Royal Courtiers assisting Gasparilla VIII. were: Louis Nei 
Esley Knight, Pendleton Taliaferro and Tod Gillett. 

ROYAL OFFICERS OF THE 1914 CORONATION BALL 

Captain — Jack Mahoney. 
First Lieut. — Jerome Waterman. 
Second Lieut. — George V. Booker. 
Royal Chamberlain — D. C. Gillett. 
Royal Directors — F. M. Anderson, J. G. Barkley, C. M. Davis? 
M. Fielder, Lawrence Gunst, E. M. Hendry, J. C. Woodsome. 

The membership for 1914 is limited to seventy-five active an 
large number of honorary members. 

In connection with this celebration of 1914, a Gasparilla Cam 
from February 21 to 24 inclusive marks an important event in Til 
history. 

Historical Peagant, February 21 — The new Lafayette street brt 
dedicated Monday, February 23, at 1 p. m. Aquatic sports 
water carnival, entrance of Krewe in pirate schooner, grand flf 
parade, followed by fantastic parade, fireworks and coronation 
Tuesday night, February 24. William Chase Temple is president 
manager of the Gasparilla Celebration, and Charles A. McKay is v 
president. 






Foreign Clubs 



CENTRO ASTURIANO 



Organized in Cuba in 1885 and has a large membership through- 

the United States. The Tampa club is a branch of this or- 

ization and was organized in 1900. The club house property is 

ted at Nebraska and Palm avenues. On the night of June 2, 

!, the handsome club house was partially destroyed by fire, thought 

Ihave been the work of an incendiary. A handsome new club 
se, costing $105,000, has just been built. 

OFFICERS 

President — Joaquin Lopez. 
Vice-Pres. — Laureano Torres. 
Treasurer — Maximilliano Gil. 
Secretary — Saturnino Menendez. 
There are fifty directors. 



CENTRO ESPAnOL DE TAMPA 

Location: Corner Seventh avenue and Sixteenth street. Tel- 
Ime 713-L. 
Founded: 1812, in Spain. 

Two new buildings completed in fall of 1912, one at above address 
one in West Tampa. 
Cost of buildings, about $150,000. 
Membership nearly 2,000. 

officers 

President — Celesta Vega. 

Vice-Pres. — Ambrosia Torres. 

Second Vice-Pres. Manuel Sanchez. 

Secretary Segundo Diaz. 

Treasurer Alfonso Fernandez. 

Honorary President' Angel I>. Cuesta. 
This club has fif'U directors. 



64 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

CIRCULO CUBANO CLUB 



Location: Tenth avenue and 14th street. Telephone 1787. 

Organized: 1899. 

Club property valued $100,000. 

OFFICERS 

President — Dr. Alfred Kholey. 

First Vice-Pres. — Manuel Diaz. 

Secretary — Nester Benidez. 

Treasurer — Ramond Colome. 

Vice-Secy. — J. Bermudez. 

Vice-Treasurer — G. Valdespino. 

Honorary President — (For the sixth term) R. M. Ybor. 






DEUTSCH-AMERIKANISCHER VEREIN 



Organized: December 1, 1901. 

Club House: Corner Nebraska and Eleventh avenues. 

Cornerstone laid by the German Ambassador, Baron Speck vi 
Steinberg, February 22, 1908. The building was dedicated in 1 
same year. 

Object: Mutual benefit, sociability and the cultivation of G<J 
man songs and German language. 

Membership: The membership of the club includes both acti 
and passive members about 1,000. 

Value of the club property about $50,000. 



President — George Stecher. 
Vice-Pres. — Julius Maas. 
Recording Secy. — H. H. Regener. 
Financial Secy. — Theodore Kautch. 
Treasurer — George Grahn. 
Trustees — H. Lehman, Ernest Kreher, Abe Maas, Willia 
Kruse, J. H. Detwiler, Henry Staebler, O. Fall 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 C5 

House Committee— John Levy, F. L. Fisher, Alex Szabo. 

Entertainment Committee — Julius Maas, William Kruse, Gus 
:kbach, K. F. Blady. 

Tampa Leiderkranz — Singing section of the club with twenty 
le voices; director, Julius Wahl. 

The president is serving his seventh term in that office and the 

-president his sixth term. 



ADDENDA 
Note: This club was organized too late for classification. 



TAMPA MUSIC CLUB 
I Founded February 9, 1914, the promoters being Madame Helene 
ler-Saxby and R. R. Barringer. 

I Meetings: Second and fourth Monday evenings from the first 
njOctober to the last of May. 
I Annual meeting fourth Monday in May. 
I The membership includes both men and women. 
I The purpose of the club is to advance music art in Tampa by 
■ling musicales among its members and by bringing artists of a 
ri order to Tampa for the benefit of the people in general. 
I The temporary officers under whose supervision the organization 
m perfected, were: 

President — Jack Lawes. 

Secretary — Mrs. Pauline Browne-Hazen. 
\nd a Committee on Constitution and By-Laws, composed of 
Is Annie Macfarlane, chairman; M. L. Price and W. H. Rieh- 
ftd. 

PRESENT OFFICERS 

President — R. R. Barringer. 

\ 'ice-Pres. — Miss Hulda Kreher. 

Secretary Mrs. Pauline Browne-Hazen, 
(now Mrs. Jack Lawes) 

Treasurer — Mr. Harry Knight. 
Hoard of Directors: For one year, Mrs. W. H. Ferris; two years. 
. Turner: three years, Miss Mamie Dawson. 



66 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

CHARTER MEMBERS 

Madame Helene Steer-Saxby, Mrs. Harold Shaw, Mrs. R. ]| 
Barringer, Mrs. Pauline Browne-Hazen, Miss Mamie Dawson, Mii 
Hulda Kreher, Miss Annie Macfarlane, R. R. Barringer, Jack Lawce 
J. A. Turner, Harry Knight, M. L. Price, W. H. Richmond. 

The first member voted in under the Constitution and By-La^ 
was Mrs. W. H. Ferris. 



pwsmess Jltredtorsr 



68 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

"TIE Satisfaction One Gets in Knowing That 
* Are Corredly Attired in Apparel and Ac 
ries of the Highest Quality, Comes to Those 
Look to This Maas Store for Their Wearables 

The patrons of this store have come to know that 
the latest and best styles are first shown here; 
that all goods sold bear the mark of quality which 
insures good value and satisfactory service y y 

Occupying this enviable position for the past twenty-seven yeau 

store is well known as 

"THE SHOPPING CENTER OF SOUTH FLORIDA" 

Maas Brothers! 

"Greater Tampa's Greater Store" 



TAMPA BOOK AND NEWS I 

Are always in advance with 
the NEW DESIGNS in 

SOCIAL STATIONERY 



In Handsome Boxes or By the Pound 

PLACE CARDS— and— TALLY CA 

OUR ENGRAVED CARDS ARE THE LATEST STYLE! 

A PLEASURE TO SHOW GOODS 
Telephone 334 513 Franklin L 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 



69 



DR CREDIT 



TERMS TO SUIT 



THE HOUSE THAT SAVES YOU MONEY 



r 



illiams Furniture Co. 

Complete House-Furnishers 



1-CRtDT 



G5Ufifl2H 



fugS 



*^ 1501-1503 FRANKLIH. CORNER SCOTT Q -^~-tf^ 



Phone 678 



CRENSHAW 



« 



standard of Reliability in the Seed Kingdom 

ijnter using Crenshaw seeds need ever worry about 
Lit, or anxious as to the genuineness of his plants. 

CRENSHAW seeds are fertile, carefully gathered. 
skilfully packed, avoiding heating, sweating or 
chilling, selected from choice, mature products of 
the field and garden. There is no "guess work" 
in using Crenshaw seeds— they are reliable. 

CRENSHAW gives you free for the asking, val- 
uable information as to kinds of sctxls best suited 
to certain soils. Years of experience and testing 
has taught facts of known value. 



CRENSHAW on a pack- 

■ is a guarantee of reli- 
Wty; fertility. 

3 VJ on a package of seed 
■T Certificate ' on a dol- 
I in the same class as 
Aleness — you can trust 
Aknow they are honest. 

Wi seed are tested — the 
• erience in testing seed 

lUis knowledge invalua- 

L Wanter. 



\ 



Crenshaw Bros. Seed Co., 

TAMPA, FLA. 
South'* Largest Poultry Supply House 



WRITE FOR CATALOGUE 
ilflAW BROS. SEED CO., 1507 Franklin Street, Tampa, Florida 



70 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 




A FAIR LOOKOUT 

in business is what the merchants and tradesmen are looking for tod< 
panics, the elections, the strenuous times are passed. It is up to us to re 

CONFIDENCE TO THE PUBLIC 

by greater display and greater bargains in all our slock. You 
the best ever if you will come here for any jewelry that you may 

PRICES ARE BARGAIN PRICES 
SOUTHERN LOAN & JEWELRY CC 

Phone 1100 717 FRANKLIN STREET Tarn].] 



Davis Shoe 
Company 

Headquarters for 
the Latest in 
Smart Footwear 



715 FRANKLIN STREET 
Tampa, Florida 



J. L. REfi 



OPEN DAY AND II 



Cor. Zack Street and Florida 
TAMPA, FLORID;] 
Phone 59 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AXD PIONEERS, 1914 



71 



Telephone 641 

Gulf City 
Painting and 
ecorating Co. 

Wholesale and Retail 

re 
Paints, Varnishes, Paint- 
ing, Hardwood Finishing 

ay 3. MILLER, Manager 

112 Fortune St., Cor. Tampa 

PA, - . FLORIDA 



Gourlie's 
Orchestra 



A. C. GOURLIE, Director 



ORCHESTRA MUSIC 

Furnished for Daces, Receptions, 
Theatres, Concerts, Etc. 




P. O. Box 509 



TAMPA, FLA. 



Falk's 
epartment 
Store 

The Home of Woman's 
Fashions'* 



^ Complete Line of Woman's 
idy-to-Wear Garments, Mil- 
ry, Shoes, Dress Goods and 
nmings always ready for your 
section at the lowest prices 
tsistent with high class goods. 



R. T. Joughin 



N. T. Gagnon 



Telephone 709 

R. T. Joughin & Co. 

Plumbing, 
Steam and Gas 
Fitting and 
Supplies 

Office and Show Rooms 

1502 Franklin St., Tampa, Fla. 



73 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 



TAILORING FOR CLOTHING 

GENTLEMEN BOYS 



HABERDASHERY 

That's Diftin&ive 

MAAS, The Haberdashi 

AND TAILOR 

CITIZENS BANK BUILDING 

BEST STORE SERVICE IN THE CITY OF TAMl! 

j 

The Blue Booi 

KITCHENS of TAMP/ 

HAVE GAS RANGES 



BECAUSE they are Economical 
BECAUSE they are Modern 
BECAUSE they are Time savers 
BECAUSE they are Cleanly 



Thousands of Families in Tan 
have tried Gas and found it all 
lutely essential to Modern Hon 
keeping. We invite you to giye ns a 



/gh TAMPA GAS CC 

XJJf No. 201 MADISON STREE 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 73 



WEN LcROY COTTER 

wen -Cotter Jewelry Co. 

Successors to S. B. LEONARDI & CO. 
Capital Stock $50,000.00 

DIAMOND MERCHANTS 

Waftelhmsilk®!?^ Eia;|iF ] sw®n a g 



onds, Watches, Jewelry, Gold and Silver Novelties, Cut 
lass, Hand-Painted China, Fine Line Spoons, Enam. 
eled Pins, Souvenirs, Alligator Goods, Etc. 

RANKLIN STREET TAMPA, FLORIDA 



MIMPEY (U, 



Every requisite of personel wear 
We launder with the greatest care. 
Just trust us for cleaning neat 
And you'll be classy from head to feet. 

American Laundry Co. 

Cor. 1 atnpa St. and \ Irndrrson Avr. 

Phone 829 



74 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 




THE HOUSE 
FURNISHER 

C. C. BUR1I 

CASH OR EASY 
PAYMENTS 

1205-1207 Franklin': 

Phone 171 



J. B. GERALD 

pianos, organs an 
Sewing machines 



SHEET MUSIC 



1105 FRANKLIN STREET 

PHONE 1385 TAMPA, FLORI 



Fo (SQOHMIOI 



DEALER IN 



SftapE® mmd Fmm<gj (3d ©©©!! !: 

Corner Franklin and Scott Streets 

Phone 167 TuESIpaig WM\ 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 



75 



ffOLFBROS. 

OUTFITTERS 

To Men, Young 
Men, Boys and 
Little Fellows 

leady for Service Clothes " 

FURNISHERS HATTERS 



Glidden's 
Racket Store 

J. H. YOUNG, Mgr. 
901 Franklin St. Tampa 

Souvenirs, Novelties 
Alligator Goods 



WE SELL EVERYTHING 



I American 
ational Bank 
Tampa, Fla. 
VITES YOU ACCOUNT 



RESOURCES OVER 
TWO MILLIONS 



W. CARRUTH Ptawkol 

. L. KNIGHT Virc-IV„,U,i 

.L. BUCHANAN Cathicf 

P. BRENNAN Aim . Cuhio 



Crescent Stables 

J. M. TUCKER, Mgr. 

Livery, Sale and 
Feed Stables 



FINE SADDLE HORSES 
A SPECIALTY 

So<5&£2£2 
1105 Florida Ave. Tampa, Fla. 

PhoOC 888 



76 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 



PENINSULAR TELEPHONE C( * 



MAIN OFFICE 
311 ZACK ST. 
TAMPA, FLA. 



THE FOLLOWING 

Arcadia 

Bartow__ 


RATES 

.$ .60 
_ .40 


Bellaire 

Bradentown 

Brooksville 

Clearwater 

Dunedin 

Green Springs 


. .35 
. .40 
. .40 
_ .35 
. .30 
_ .35 



PENINSULAR 



LOCAL 

AND ,',. 

LONG M 
DISTANCE. \ 

ITELEPHONE CO 



Jacksonville $ 1 .25 

Kissimmee .45 

Lakeland .30 

Largo .45 

Loughman .45 

Manatee .40 

Mulberry .40 

Orlando .60 



Welcomi 
Tourist 



Palatka $1' 

Palmetto 

Plant City 

Sarasota 

St. Augustine 1 

St. Petersburg 

Tarpon Springs 

Thonotosassa 



FOR OTHER RATES AND INFORMATION CALL "LONG DISTANC 



#tnart <&sxsi\xmt% 



EMBOBYIHE POETRY an^ 



ART OF THE WORLD'S 



INGENIOUS ARTISTS 



MRS. S. D. MURPHY 

601^ Franklin St. phone 1507 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 77 



tor Talking Machines High-Class and Popular Music 

| and Supplies Song "Hits" as They Come Out 

FOR 

"EVERYTHING MUSICAL" 

CALL AT 




909 FRANKLIN STREET 
TAMPA, FLA. 

Telephone 197 
88-Note Player Rolls Small Inslruments and 

tury and McKinley Editions Supplies 



All High-grade 
Puilding Materials 

ATLAS PORTLAND CEMENT 
ELK'S BRICK LECC'S BRICK 

BIBBS SEWER AND DRAIN PIPE 

AGATITE CEMENT PLASTER 

PULLER'S ,EMII ' 5 " L '" BRAND ROOPING 

ETALSHINGLES CRUSHED ROCK 

LAKE WIER SAND 

BEAVER BOARD. &c. &c 



W. R. PULLER 

SOLE STATE DISTRIBUTOR 
ONES -T- A » „ , — , A , — , A Henorv & Knio httfr- 

7 - 208 IAMKA. h LA. minals (Foot of FraaUm SO 



78 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 



Henry Giddens Clothing C« 

THE CLOTHING CORNER 

TAMPA, FLORIDA 

When you get an article from a Sore you are impressed with 1 
trade mark that article bears. If you will insist on every memlt 
of the family using goods bearing our label it will save you troulfl 
and worry. <J[ Henry Giddens Clothing Co. for twenty ye;' 
has stood for HONEST VALUES AT A FAIR PRK 



EVERYTHING IN MEN'S WEAR 



HENRY GIDDENS CLOTHING CC 

Giddens Building, The Clothing Corner 



YOUR CREDIT IS GOOD WITH US 



Gulf Furniture 
Company 



R. RIGGSBEE, Prop. 



1415 Franklin St. 



Phone 1615 



We Sell for Cash or 
on Easy Payments 

TERMS: 10% Down, Balance 
Small Weekly Payments 



xs. ffteletw §fittv~8f*x\ 

IJtantste mib €amyostt 

407 $t%zon Street $ ? be I] 

'Ulantpa, jflloriba 

1§ Receives pupils at her studio for Pianc 
Theory, Musical Interpretation and F< 

^ She studied in Paris, London, Dres<< 
and Weimar 

^ Her instructors in Piano were Sir Juj 
Benedict, Stavenhagen and Dannreuti 
(severally pupils of Weber, Liszt « 
Chopin); Voice, Garcia 

^ Refined, erudite Diction a specialty, 
English, French and German. 

^ Mrs. Saxby's pupils passed the higri 
examinations of the Royal Academy t 
Royal College of Music, London, E; 
land, including the degree of L. R. A. 

1$ Mrs. Saxby is open for Recitals Q 
Musical History Lectures. Recitals 
her own compositions have been a spec 
feature of her work, and critics have 1 
ened her to Chaminade 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 



79 



I HE SOUTH* S FINEST FURNITURE STORE 



ine 

niture 

lin 

riod 

tyles 




Furnishings 
For 

The 

Home 



RUGS OF ELEGANCE 



<J&W> 




Street at Twiggs 



Tampa, Florida 



Huftomer Refers to Our Store as Follows: 

' '/ pay more for Shoes as good 
as yours; as much for Shoes 
considerably inferior, and only 
at your store can I obtain the 
HTLST Shoes at your prices. " 

ZGERALD-POMAR SHOE CO. 

815 FRANKLIN STREET 



80 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 



THEME US ©MILY ©ME WEPDETC SEAS? 



&WB ST LASTS TUHOTCTOPT THE YE 



YOUR GIFT TO THE BRIDE 

May be as Expensive or as Inexpensive as you care to m< 

A CHEST OF STERLING SILVER, A TEA SERVICE 
OR A SET OF HAVILAND CHINA WILL ALWAYS 
BE AN ACCEPTABLE GIFT FROM "THE FAMILY/ 

For those not so nearly related we suggest 
Sterling Silver in Sets or Single Pieces, Cut Glass or II 
Crystal in Dorflinger's or Pairpoint's Produdts, a Pretty 
Single Piece of French or Dresden China 



Wedding Gifts Five to Ten Dollars a Special Feature 
W. H. BECKWITH JEWELRY CO. 

410 Franklin St. "THE HOUSE OF QUALITY" Tampa. 1 1 



HARRIS CLOTHING O 

CORRECT CLOTHES 
FOR MEN 

Hampton Block 713 Franklin St 

Phone 274 






L. E. KNIGHT, Pre*. A. J. KNIGHT, Vice-Pres. H. J. WATROUS, Mgr. WM. M. EVANS.J 

Fire Insurance REAL ESTATE Rental Ag 

Telphone 44 Tampa, Fla. 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIOXEERS, 1914 



81 



["AMFA BAY HOTEL 



ft 







Charming New Japanese 
Tea Room 

OR PRIVATE CARD PARTIES AND TEAS 



vate Receptions, Dances, Dinners and 
Debut Parties given here by Tampa 
People a Specialty 



W. F. ADAMS, M K r. 



82 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 





WM. PANN 

SALES AGENT 

Vitrified Brick 

Atlanta, Ga. 





The Most Up-to-Date Cleaning and Pressing Establishment in South Florida 

The Ideal Cleaning Compai 

S. R. POOSER, Manager 

Telephone 2475 1313 Florida Avenue 

TAMPA, FLORIDA 

Cleaning and Dyeing of All Kind! 

We Guarantee Satisfaction Club Rates to Members 



We Make, Clean, Press and Repair all Outer Garmi 
Feathers Cleaned, Dyed and Properly Treated 
Out-of-town Orders Receive Personal Attention 



Evening Gowns, Goats and Wraps 
a Specialty 



EXPERT WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED 






TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 



83 




W *r KtKBAlX C<XCBJC*CO,UX.V S.A. l 



[TIE KIMBALL 

PIANO AND PLAYER 
HAVE NO SUPERIORS 

SOLD FOR LESS THAN SOME BECAUSE IT 
IS MARKETED DIRECT BY ITS MAKERS 



4 



;J|f 



Le Most Popular and Artistic Piano Made 
OVER 235,000 IN USE 

Invesfigate the Kimball, the Kimball Prices, the 
Kimball Terms, and the Kimball Guarantee 

You'll find value for every dollar you pay, just as thousands 
of buyers have during the past fifty years 



gue, Prices and Terms 
on or Address 

\ SCOTT 

Representative 

ars With Kimball) 




1105 
Franklin Street 

TAMPA. FLA. 

Factories Chicago 



84 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 










<s 


< 


3 




<s 




c 


• 


• )H 


tn 




?> 


T5 


• »— « 


c 


> 


cd 


<u 




T3 


bfl 




c 


p^ m ■< 


• i— < 


OS 


<8 


• i-^ 


(U 


U-i 


1 ~ 


<t5 




<u 


C 


H ' 




QJ 




£0 


4— > 


c 


O 




-D 


£ 


-o 


<u 


G 


4-» 


w2 


9-1 

0) 


<U 


,-G 


pX) 


4— > 




o 




>-» 




d 




cd 




s 




<l> 




> 




CCS 




~& 





M 
S 

c: 






£ 



<D 






TAMPA BLUE BOOK AXD PIOXEERS, 1914 



85 



rf2037-R 



P.O. Box 495 



I Tampa 
Municipal Band 



AND 



Heidi's Orchestra 






MUSIC FURNISHED 
FOR RECEPTION^ 
AND BALLS ON 
APPLICATION 



HEIDT 



Factory No, 1 



mA 




Hay; 



HAVANA 
CIGARS 




GERMAN 

AMERICAN 

CLUB 



1 I 



i 1358 






SOCIAL FEATURES FOR MEMBERS ONLY 

Rathskeller Restaurant 

OPFN FROM 8 A. M TO 12 P. M 

FRITZ PHERICH. Mnn««rrr 

("ornrr Nrlua^ka aivl Eleventh Avrnurs 



86 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 



tZPfce 

parlors 

Rooms 15 and 16, Petteway Bldg. 
TAMPA, FLA. 

Acne and Pimples Cured, Mas- 
sage of Face and Body, Hydro- 
Vacu and Electrical Massage, 
Chiropractics, Manicuring, Sham- 
pooing, J£ Hair - Dressing and 
Scalp Treatment a Specialty. J£ 
A Cure of Dandruff Guaranteed 

PHONE 2574 

Mrs. M. V. Gulletie Miss L. Coutts 
Dr. R. Atwood Macurda, Manager 




DAWSON & THORNTON* 

Fashionabll 
Apparel 
for Men 

DAWSON and THORNTT 
BUILDING 







Citizens Bant 
and Trnst G 

JOHN TRICE Presw 

C E. ALLEN Vice-Presin 

E. M. HENDRY___.Vice-Pre.ic 

Dr. L. A. BIZE Vice-Presb 

W. W. TRICE Cm 

D. H. LANEY Asst. Com 

W. W. BLOUNT____Asst. CtH 



Capital 
Surplus 



- $250,000.00- 

- $500,000.00' 



DIRECTORS: 
Frank Bentley, S. R. Morey, L. A. B 
M. D., A. L. Cuesta, W. W. Trice, E.: 
Hendry, W. E. Dorchester, John Trice, E 
Lucas, John Savarese, Isaac Maas, E. Pe«^ 
W. B. Gray, C. E. Allen, John T. Dism«1a 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIOXEERS, 1914 87 

a vorite Line Steamers 

DAILT PASSENGER AND FREIGHT SERVICE 

lendid Steamers :: Regular Sailings 

cellent Cuisine :: High-Class Service 

MPA :, ST. PETERSBURG :: PASS-A.GRILLE 
3RADENTOWN :: PALMETTO :: MANATEE 
MANAVISTA :: ELLENTON 



SPECIAL SERVICE TO ANNA MARIA BEACH 
TERRA CEIA AND PALMA SOLA 



SEE SCHEDULE IN DAILY BAPERS OR PHONE OR ADDRESS 
A. E. JARDINE, General Manager 

St. Petersburg Transportation Company 
ce 230 Tampa, Florida Phone 463 



jMlSS HELEN HILL 

©(fell IKlmdmir^mir^mm 



^Select School Employing the Most 
Modern Methods 

SPRING TERM CONVENED MONDAY. FEBRUARY 2 

T ST. AND CEDAR AVE., NEXT TO HYDE PARK METHODIST CHURCH 

Phone 1230 



'anIB®®© Chimed 



99 



THE CORSET OF COMFORT AND BEAUTY 

nubone" Mm ^ o Td A. QMHH, SiM® M|ir„ 

■PS, STAYS AND No 2l02 Tmmpm Slrccl 

XXESSORIES Telephone 2311 TAMPA, FLORIDA 



88 TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 

GOOD HOUSEKEEPERS 

- -USE 

Town Talk Tlou 

Are Yon? 



THE BEST FOR EVERY 
PURPOSE 



CHAS, H. NOOKHOUSZ 

WHOLESALE DISTRIBUTOR 

Tampa, Florida 



"Ball Grocery Ct 

THE MODERN | 
GROCERY STORE 



503 Franklin Street Phones 12 9 563, 564, j 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PI03STEERS, 1914 89 



LARNER F. E. McKEE 



(McKEE & COMPANY 



PEOALTH 



DEALESS IN 

Irt Glass Windows, Plate and Prism Glass, 
Lhurch Pews, Theater and School Seats, 
| Zouri Store Front Construction, Metal 
Windows and Doors, Architectu- 
ral Terra Cotta, Structural Iron 
and Steel Reinforcing Bars, 
Waterproofing, Sash and 
Doors, Metal and Wood 
Screens, Etc., Etc. 



• 



ONE 397 204 TWIGGS STREET 

TAMPA, FLORIDA 



90 



TA3IPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 



HODGE & SHERMAf 

COMPLETE' HOUSEFURNISHER 



^-^^^S^^^^^^^^^t2»Eaa 




Inm^iliSllnul aliilllliilB'liMufHSBIWffiHB 


|J 


laPSS Sj3»S34»iri' vnEwaftaBSBB 


Jj^^CTm^H^^^hj^^w^^Sp^' 


^^s^^t^UmKM^^^^ 


OUR NEW HOME 




Corner Florida Avenue and Polk Sfreet 





TAMPAN LEADING HOUSEFURNISHER 

We occupy 30,000 square feet of floe 
space, and show the largest and mosi com 
plete stock of Furniture and HousefurnisU 
ings in the State. 

"Best store service, liberal credit systeri 
and the best values money can buy is whai 
you get at our slore." 

OUT-OF-TOWN CUSTOMERS I 
We pay Freight We Refund R. R. Far 






TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914 



91 



T MMF A TM 



be. 



BOTE 



\ 



FOBLHSEIIM^ ۩ 



LARGEST AND MOST 
COMPLETE BOOK AND 
JOB PRINTING HOUSE 
IN SOUTH FLORIDA 



958686668866668866 

Mlwmh M©©hm mm<& ftlfa© IB©©ft 

866666666866666661 

TELEPHONE 491 

AND A REPRESENTATIVE WILL BE 

GLAD TO CALL ON YOU 



Orders from Any Part of the State Given Prompt Attention 



S. F. BRENGLE 

BUILDING MOVER 



Contractor for Handling Hfavy Machinery 
smokestacks. etc. 



EfHONE I 385 



TAM PA. FLOR IDA 



l I03 Franklin St 



92 



TAMPA BLUE BOOK AND PIONEERS, 1914< 



The Tampa-Cuba Cigar Compam 



HIGHEST GRADE 



Clear Havana Cigars 



AT 



PRINCIPAL BRANDS: 

TA-CU (Oasis) La Flor de Tampa Cuba 



65 Sizes, 5c. to $1.00 each 



H. B. GUILFORD, Pres. 

Rochester, N. Y. 



E. BERGER, Sec. & Gen M 
Tampa, Florida 



dim